Martin Stellar - Coach & Consultant for ethical sales and business growth

Martin Stellar - Coach & Consultant for ethical sales and business growth

Buyer Psychology, Impact, and Pricing Your Work – and Making Selling 10x Easier

What would you prefer: a dollar, or ten dimes?

Sounds like it’s the same thing, but it isn’t.

See, there’s a common misconception in the mind of many business owners:

That selling at a lower price point makes it easier to land clients.

But that’s the kind of sloppy thinking that makes for a tough business to run.

Think about it:

For every lead that you create, you have to spend resources:

Money, time, mental resources, and so on.

If you then try to create a client at say $100, you have to spend ten times the resources to reach *counts fingers* $1000 in revenue.

And then you have to deliver your service – your coaching, training, consulting, whatever it is you do, ten times.

But if you try to create a $1000 client, you have just reduced your efforts and the cost of generating that client by a factor 10.

And the ‘secret’ is that it’s usually just as much work to land a $1000 client, as it is to land a $100 client.

So far for the logic.

Next up: the psychology of the buyer.

If you do something really valuable for people, something transformative, something that gets them a high return on the investment they make with you (whether that’s in terms of cash returns or changes in their life), you want people to buy because of the value you deliver.

Your best buyers are those who want the impact you provide.

And if you price your work low, you’ll end up talking to people who aren’t looking for high impact and high ROI, but instead they’ll be looking for low price.

And the psychology of low price is that as long as the dollar amount you propose isn’t what they’re happy to spend, no amount of promised impact will convince them to hire you.

In other words: there’s value-buyers, and price-buyers – and price buyers are very, very costly because they tend to be very hard to convert.

Whereas value-buyers are more discerning, easier to identify, less concerned about dollar amounts – AND they are overall much more fun to work with.

A price-buyer thinks in terms of scarcity. They want ‘value for money’, and while you should obviously provide value for money, that kind of buyer will always want more, because they tie value to a dollar amount.

Value buyers however, tie value to impact.

And if you position yourself right, and put yourself in front of people who want impact, you’ll find that they’re far easier to enroll.

Yes it’s scary to ask for the big bucks, but you’ll find that people who want to buy impact are the kind who are much less concerned about the actual price.

And, bonus: that’s also the kind of buyer who is more likely to actually have the money to invest with you.

So before you go out and underprice yourself, ask:

Who do you actually want to work with?

People who count dollars… or people who size up the impact you can deliver for them, and base their decision on that impact – the outcome you promise?

As for me and the impact that my work delivers:

I can help you get comfortable with selling your work, and get really good at it.

And the impact of that… well, that’s huge.

No more stress, no more awkwardness… and instead, an approach to enrollment that both you and your buyer enjoy.

And, you’ll be working to earn a dollar, instead of ten dimes – and that’s a lot easier.

Want that?

Then talk to me, and let’s see what we can do.

We’ll take 30 minutes on Zoom to see where you’re at, and whether the 1on 1  LEAP training on ethical selling is right for you.

If it is, we’ll take it from there, no pressure.

 

Cheers,

Martin

Stewardship in Sales

An average seller tries to reason with people:

“Once you understand how good of a choice it is to buy this thing…!”

A good seller though, works with benefits and desires and outcomes:

“You’re telling me you want outcome X, which is precisely what we created this offer for. It looks like this is the thing you’ve been looking for”.

But a terrific seller works relationships and service:

“I’m here to help you get to the right decision, be it buy or don’t buy. Talk to me about any concern you may have, I’m not pushing anything here”.

And someone who sells with a purpose, from the heart, out of sheer desire to make a positive impact?

That person seller sells stewardship:

“I’m here to make sure you’re taken care of – by me, and by the product or service you’ll be using. I’m here to be a steward over your outcomes”.

That seller btw is the one who gets the easiest sales, most referrals, and best clients.

Sell stewardship.

Let people know you’re there for them, looking out for them

Oh, and for those readers who want to learn how to do that: I’m here for you.

Cheers,

 

Martin

How to Make Selling Easier by Looking at Your Buyer’s Perspective

It would seem to make sense, that in order for someone to enroll in your offer, you need to find out how to get that person to see what you see.

Once they see your vision of their ideal outcome, then they’ll get on board.

You know that if they go along with your proposal, they’ll benefit. You can see it, clear as day.

So, the job at hand becomes ‘how to convey my vision’.

But as you’ll have experienced, that’s a damn hard thing to accomplish.

People have their objections, their fears, their reasons why and why not…

But if only they would see what you see… then they’d buy in!

Right?

Wrong.

You can’t sell people on your vision.

Instead, you need to step into their vision – or what psychologists call ‘perspective-taking’.

Because when a sale happens, it happens not in your world, but in theirs.

It’s the vision that they have, that determines whether or not they’ll buy into your proposal.

And once you see their side of things, you’ll be able to ask the questions they need to hear, in order to get clarity, remove doubts, and dissolve fears.

That way, their vision adjusts, so that it ends up overlapping with yours.

And that’s when the sale happens.

So how do you do that – how do you create a shared vision?

Simple: use empathy. And not the kind where you empathise with their problems, and give them a shoulder to cry on.

I’m talking about the empathy that enables you to see their world, through their eyes.

It’s not their job to take your perspective – instead, it’s your job to take their perspective.

Put yourself in the other person’s shoes, and your sales will be much much easier.

Learn how to do exactly that, in my 10-week 1on1 training on ethical selling.

Details here: http://martinstellar.com/helping-good-people-sell-more-and-generate-a-bigger-impact/

Cheers,

 

Martin

 

 

Values –> Alignment –> Resonance –> Sale

Whenever someone buys something, there’s something that resonates with them.

Somewhere in the mix of desired outcomes, emotions, trust and thought, there’s a ‘vibe’ that goes “Yeah. Want”.

And if ever you came out of a conversation with a potential buyer and they didn’t buy, it means that there was some element of resonance missing.

So how do you create that? How do you have the kind of sales conversation that resonates so much with people that they buy?

Lead with values.

The things that you’d get on a barricade for, and the things that you consider wrong.

You have them, and so does your buyer.

When talking to people, it’s easy to discover whether or not you have values and principles in common.

If you don’t, you’re out of alignment with that person – which isn’t a disaster, but it does make it more likely that you won’t reach enough resonance for them to buy.

The solution?

Put yourself in front of people who have similar or same values as you do.

That way, the moment you start talking, you’re aligned on an extremely important psychological level.

And as you converse, you’ll both discover that you have more and more values and principles in common.

Each time they realise that, they feel more aligned with you.

And that makes it SO much easier to create a client, compared to trying to enroll someone whose values are far off from yours.

Making sure your buyer-conversations are with people who are aligned with you is one of the quickest and most powerful ways to increase your conversion rate.

Did that click for you?

Then have a look at what the LEAP Framework for Ethical Selling can do for you…

Cheers,

 

Martin

 

 

Three Questions That Determine Whether They’ll Buy – And the Second Gets Way Too Little Attention

Yes, of course: people need to know you, like you, and trust you, if they’re going to buy your thing.

But Know, Like & Trust, aren’t enough.

On a very primal psychological level, evolutionary style, everyone subconsciously asks three questions when dealing with others:

Do I like you?

Can you help me?

Do I trust you?

And that middle part – the other’s belief in your ability to help – is something often overlooked.

Think about it:

A buyer needs to have the conviction that you can help them  their problem. Without that, they’ll never buy.

But saying that you can do X or Y for them doesn’t cut it.

Whether you say ‘I make a good breakfast’ or ‘I fix your SEO’ or ‘I help you get really good at enrolling buyers’ (that would be me saying it) does nothing to convince someone.

It’s data, information, a statement.

For someone else to believe it – to trust that it’s true – that you can help them, something has to happen in their mind.

A doubt or question needs to be addressed in such a way, that they go from ‘Can they?’ to ‘Oh wow, they can!’

Saying it won’t make it happen.

Persuasion doesn’t make it happen.

Nor does a list of awards, education, resume or bio.

For a buyer to believe that you can help, they need to have an insight that leads to conviction.

They need to know that yeah, you’re the guy or gal for the job.

That’s when people buy.

So is there nothing you can do to have a buyer go through that process?

Sure there is:

1: Have a conversation, and frame it as an exploration into goals, current situation, and obstacles inbetween those.

2: Sell them on one thing only: your care and concern for them as a person and as a business owner. Be genuinely interested, in finding out exactly what their needs are.

3: Ask questions that invite the other to try out different perspectives.

And the best way to do that?

Talk to people – especially past buyers – and ask them specific questions, so that you get to the full understanding of their needs.

That way, they’ll realise that yes, “This person can, indeed, help me!”

This is why the IP to Profit system starts with research, and it shows you exactly which questions to ask.

Pay what you want for the 1-hour training (until Friday, then the price goes back up to $49).

Access the training here.

Cheers,

 

Martin

 

 

Stacking Your Assets for Fun & Profit

Far too little attention gets given to the assets a business has, and the way they can be made to leverage each other.

And we all have assets, but most of the time we don’t make them work for us, and then we end up spending more time and money on driving new sales, when we can easily get sales from our customer list.

Because yes, a list of past and current customers is a terrific asset to leverage.

If people have paid you before, there’s a good chance they’ll do so again – provided you show up and talk to them.

Or consider your specific, individual talent or ability: whether you call it Intellectual Property, or intellectual capital, or your ‘Zone of Genius’ work: it’s a super valuable asset.

If you package it into a programme or system, meaning you can & clone yourself, you can get your work into the hands of more people.

(Incidentally, to help you do that is exactly why I built the IP to Profit System)

Then there’s your values – the things you’d stand on a barricade for – that too is an asset, because when you identify and connect with people who have similar values, you instantly have rapport with them.

And there’s more: your team, your intelligent ability to think up solutions or systems, your likeability, your network… lots of assets, and each can be put to use for greater results.

So many assets to leverage!

So then, how do you make most use of your assets, and get all you can out of everything you’ve got – how do you ‘stack your assets’ in the simplest, fastest way?

Simple: you take your customer list, you analyse and segment it for needs and urgencies, and you create an offer based on your intellectual property, and you ask your past buyers if they want it.

How?

That’s precisely what you’ll learn in the IP to Profit system. Until this Friday it’s pay-what-you-want, and you can get it here.

Cheers,

 

Martin

 

 

A Lesson George Bernard Shaw Wants You to Learn

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” — George Bernard Shaw

Ok, it’s presumptuous of me to speak for Mr. Shaw – but, whatever.

I’ll take that liberty, because I’m sure he’d be happy if more people realised the wisdom of his words.

Because yes, we often think we communicate, when actually we don’t.

That is: we think we communicate thing A, and then act all surprised (or even upset) when it appears that the other person heard thing B.

If you’ve ever been in a situation where you found yourself thinking ‘why are they not getting it?’, then that’s what happened.

You said one thing, but the other heard another thing.

Of course you can blame the other for being stubborn or contrary, and in some cases that may be at play – but even then, that does not exonerate you from the responsibility of communicating in a different way, and trying to find out how to get your message across.

And this applies everywhere: In business and selling; at home; with your spouse or kids; with your students or team mates or prospects:

It’s on us to find the way ‘in’, and figure out how to get the right message across.

Misunderstandings are not ‘their fault’ – they are ‘our responsibility to fix’.

And here’s the secret: saying more won’t help more.

In fact, when you think that communication has taken place but it hasn’t, the more you keep talking, the bigger the misunderstanding will become.

Put differently: if the other person doesn’t seem to get you, explaining harder will be counterproductive.

Instead, ask questions.

Because unless you learn more about the other person and what they heard and what they think of it, how are you going to accurately adjust your message?

When you find that a buyer (or friend or team mate or spouse) isn’t getting what you mean, ask yourself this:

What did they hear me say?

How does it differ from what I meant?

What should I ask them, to figure out how to adjust the message I’m trying to communicate?

A useful tool in all communication – and especially in the context of selling and signing on clients.

Incidentally (actually: intentionally) that’s why the IP to Profit system I designed to help you generate sales from your customer list, starts with asking questions.

It’s the only way to figure out what current, pressing, costly problems your past buyers have – and you need to know that, if you’re going to make them offers that they’ll want to pick up.

Doing so will enable you to keep serving and keep earning, even when right now everything is so complicated for most every business. 

Check out the system here…

And in case you missed it: you can access the 1-hour training at whichever price you like, even free – it’s pay-what-you-want, but that will go back to the normal $49 ticket soon.

Cheers, 

 

Martin

 

 

When a Buyer Says “I Don’t Have the Money”

Really annoying when that happens, isn’t it?

You’ve spoken with the person, they love what you do, they have a clear and present need and want, you’ve made your offer…

And then they say “I just don’t have that kind of money”.

In some cases, they’re stating a fact. Sometimes, people just don’t have the funds to pay for your offer.

In many cases though – if not most of the cases – what they’re really saying is “I don’t have the money for that”.

Where ‘that’ means: the value that could bring the, but that you didn’t manage to adequately show.

More often than not, people hem and haw about buying your work and the cost of it, but then they’ll turn around and buy a TV or phone or an extension to their home.

Because that, to them, is value they want, and so that’s where they allocate their money. They have the money for that.

So if they clearly need and want your help, but they tell you they don’t have the money or it’s too expensive, remember this:

It’s your job to have a buyer see the value of what you’re offering.

And if they don’t, it means you didn’t get that value expressed and perceived.

And, it’s not necessarily game over at that point.

You can still continue the conversation, and still get the deal – but only if you ask questions that have the buyer see for themselves what the value is.

And one very powerful question to ask is:

“If money weren’t an issue, would it be a yes?”

You’ll be amazed at where a sales conversation can go if that’s your reply to “ain’t got the money” or “it’s too much”.

Do you ever get into situations like these, where people want your thing but they didn’t see the value?

Then check out the IP to Profit system… it’ll show you how to create an offer that’s so aligned with their needs and wants, they’ll easily see the value – and buy into your offer.

For the time being, you can have the entire training system + slides, at any price you like, even for free. (normally: $49, but right now it’s pay-what-you-want)

Check it out here. 

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

 

 

Upgrade Yourself & Tune the Human Machine

Last summer, just when I’d finished a new page on my website, I clicked the wrong button, and completely nuked my website. Oops.

Normally I’d try and fix it, but this time, I decided to rebuild it all from the ground up.

The experience was deeply transformative, and the lesson I learned might be relevant to you, because the process wasn’t just an upgrade to my website:

It involved an upgrade to my branding and positioning, but more importantly, it was an upgrade to the self: a change in self-identity.

And when you’re trying to sell your services, that self-identity is massively important.

Are you a mere provider, someone who needs the client to please ok your offer and give you money?

Or are you the holder of specific, unique-to-you skills, and you qualify the prospect just as much as they need to qualify you?

In many, many cases, it’s the former.

Far too many people position themselves as a supplicant.

“Please mr prospect, will you please validate me, and buy my thing?

That’s wrong on many levels.

For one thing, where’s your self-esteem, your positioning, your confidence?

But also, it’s wrong because it gives the wrong signal to the buyer.

It shows neediness, and that drives people away.

When you seem needy, the buyer will have alarm-bells ringing in their subconscious.

Instead, show confidence.

There’s a million potential clients out there.

But there’s only one of you.

So that self-image you have – what does it look like?

How do you perceive yourself, what’s your stance, what’s your attitude?

Would it need an upgrade?

If so, maybe it’s time to ‘tune the human machine’ and upgrade yourself and your self-image.

And, provided we’re the right fit, maybe I can help.

More info here…

Cheers,

Martin

It’s the Singer, Not the Song: Your Revenue Needs More Than Just a System

When I launched the IP to Profit system back in spring, for developing a new revenue centre out of your customer list, my coach said:

“In such uncertain times, how do you know that a system will work?”

Brought back memories of that Stones song: It’s the singer, not the song.

Because he’s right.

Not just in uncertain times, but always:

We can’t ever know if a system will work, because any system depends on how you use it, how well it’s executed.

Everything hinges on how we show up to a task or a project.

How we operate, implement, execute.

The song (i.e. the system) might be good, but if it also ‘sounds’ good (gets you sales) that’s because of the ‘singer’ (you, the one operating the system).

And the IP to Profit system is no exception.

Sure it’s really well-built even if I say so myself, and yes it’s got all the steps to go from market research, through the copy you need to write, through selling and optimising your campaign.

And yes, you can make a revenue centre around your Intellectual Property, even at times like these…

…but it’ll require the best of you.

Meaning: By itself, the IP to Profit system itself isn’t enough – it’s down to you, and your dedication and attitude and execution.

If you’ve got those in place, then you *might* be able to make your IP earn you money, even if the business world right now is in full VUCA (Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, Ambiguity).

Point is, if you don’t use some sort of structure or framework or system, it’s hard to know what to do, and in which order.

And from the actions you take, it’ll be hard to measure what worked best so that you can iterate and optimise, if you’re not using a testable system.

And that’s why the IP to Profit system is so useful:

Not because it promises the end-all solution, but because it gives you a framework in which to operate, enabling you to indeed show up as your best self, and get the most out of it.

And, it enables you to get the most out of your single most valuable asset:

Your list, your database, all the people in your world you can talk to and help.

And to leverage that asset in a systematic way and keep your serving and selling going, consider getting the system: a 1-hour training, yours to have and own, slides included.

It’s pay-what-you-want (including free, if you want) until next Friday. Don’t miss it…

Cheers,

Martin

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