Why You Shouldn’t Have Good Ideas

From the outside, it’s easy to see what would be good for other people.

This one would benefit from more exercise.

That one would feel better, being on a diet.

Your spouse would be happier if they stopped seeing that toxic friend.

Your kid would feel proud, if only they’d do their homework.

Your buyer, well obviously they’d see results if they proceed to checkout.

And, yes, everybody would feel much less of that low-level (or not so low, as the case may be) anxiety that’s so common these days, if folk would take in less news and spend less time on social media.

Good ideas, all of them.

If people would adopt your good ideas, they’d benefit.

Problem is, if they don’t ask for your good ideas, it’s better to not share them.

Because no matter how good the advice is, sharing it without the other person inviting you to do so, will almost always have the opposite effect of what you want for that person.

Unsollicited advice causes resistance, gets defenses up, because it tells the other person: “You’re doing it wrong”.

That might not be what you mean, but what they hear is more important than what you mean.

After all, the message heard is the real message – not the message shared.

So if you *really* want the best for others, have no good ideas for them.

Instead, have questions for them.

Keep asking questions, so that they may find clarity, and discover their own good ideas.

And if they don’t, keep asking questions up until the point that they ask you what you think.

At that moment, share your idea, suggestion, or recommendation.

They’ll be open to what you have to say, receptive to your viewpoint, and they’ll be far more likely to take on board what you think, and they’ll own it too.

Want to sell your good ideas to people?

Then try not having any good ideas.

Cheers,

Martin

P.s. Tomorrow is the live ethical sales training that I had to postpone last week. If you want to join, register here: http://martinstellar.com/leap-ethical-selling-system/


Also published on Medium.

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