Why You Should Never Check In With Clients, and What to Do Instead

You’ll have had it happen: someone tells you that yes, they want to buy your thing.

A day goes by… a week… two weeks… no payment, no news.

A lot of business owners then shy away and give up, but the smart ones follow up.

“Hi, I’m just checking in to see…”

Terrible idea. (Pet-peeve time: check in with someone? What, is your prospect an airport?)

Seriously though: saying that you’re checking in sends the wrong message.

(Also: using the word ‘just’ isn’t a good idea, because psychologically, it reduces the size of what is probably an important decision for them).

But the real problem is, that you saying you want to check in, makes it about you.

It speaks of neediness, and that breaks trust.

You need that sale, but if they decide to buy, it’s because – first and foremost – buying from you *is good for them*.

Checking in says the opposite: it’s good for you.

What to do instead?

Ask a direct question, with the intention of helping them.

Examples:

“Is there anything you need help with in order to make a decision?”

“Is there any confusion or lack of clarity you’d like me to clear up?”

“Am I correct in assuming that right now might not be the right time for you?”

Or, the powerhouse question: ask for a no.

“I understand this might not be the right time for you – can you let me know it’s a no for the moment, so we can both move on?”

Very often, asking for a no removes the last objection to buying, the trust and confidence issue.

Asking for a no clearly empowers them, gives them the right to veto, gives them full ownership of the decision, and very importantly:

Asking for a no makes it super clear that you’re not needy. Bam: more trust. And often: a final decision to move forward and become a client.

All this, and more, in the LEAP Sales System, which I’ll reveal shortly.

Stay tuned…

Cheers,

Martin


Also published on Medium.

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