What if You – GASP – DIDN'T Ask for the Sale?

Just received some copy feedback from a client.

She’s having me write emails for her list, and obviously I included a call to action in each.

Because like I always say: The best way to get more business is by asking for it.

Given the type of person on her list, I deliberately created a very mild CTA – much more gentle than the ones I write in my own emails.

You know, things like: “If you’d like to work with our team of coaches, feel free to reply to this email.”

Pretty gentle, right?

Not gentle enough – red flag went up: My client very explicitly stated that no, that’s too aggressive.

She wants a CTA in each email, but of the type: “What about you, how do you implement this in your
work?”

I’m fine with it – no point in trying to force my will on anyone.

But here’s the thing: When you put out a message to your list, and you end with a call to action, you’re using a technique to generate leads.

You’re inviting people to respond, which they’ll only do if they are interested…

Question is: What are they interested in?

If you invite someone to start a conversation with you, then that’s the reason they’ll get in touch.

Which is fine, social, valuable, and very useful.

But if you’re in business, isn’t it more interesting to have people be interested in working with you?

And contact you for that reason in particular?

The key notion here is that there’s no right or wrong. She’s very clever in that she doesn’t want to piss off her readers.

What matters is that you’re aware that the way which you generate a lead determines the follow-up process

If a person comes to you in order to converse, it’ll take much longer and it’ll be much more work to convert them into customers than if they come asking questions about working with you.

Neither one is better than the other. It’s just a strategic decision.

My client is very good at having conversations, and using those to convert those low-interest leads into customers.

So in her case it makes sense to do it her way. (I’d still prefer to ask for a sale instead of a conversation, but hey we all have our hangups, don’t we?)

There are no set and standard procedures. No cookie cutter sales solutions. Doesn’t exist

Trying to shoehorn your market into whatever some marketing ‘gooroo’ tells you is 100% failsafe is very likely to fail.

Each product is different, each vendor or maker, lists are different, demographics, interests – there IS no standard client that you can apply a standard strategy to.

It all needs to be tuned to your ideal client, just as my client is having me do with the emails I write for her.

If you send regular emails (which you should – here’s why I want to force my will, but juuust a little), getting that call to action right, to really match with the inner world of your readers can be tricky.

That’s why you could consider getting me on board as a writing coach. (Mild CTA, see?)

I mean I could also do what Hugh MacLeod did when he designed labels for a South African vineyard called Stormhoek.

I actually saw those bottles in a supermarket when I was in the UK.

A cartoon on it of a puppy, the name of the vineyard, and the copy:

“Buy me or the puppy gets it.”

Very, very hard CTA.

(He’s insane, but he’s also a genius: Stormhoek went and became very big when they got him on board.)

There’s a scale, going from MacLeod style hard CTA, all the way to pitches that are so mild that people hardly notice them.

Somewhere in-between those two points you’ll find your own perfect type of pitch.

Figuring out which one that is, how to write it, and how to do it in such a way that nobody could possibly upset or offended –

That’s what I teach my students when they join my mentorship program.

The result?

And engaged audience and more sales.

So if you want some of that for yourself, hit reply. (Semi-mild CTA)

Cheers,

Martin

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