Weird Huh? The More Skills You Offer, the Fewer Sales You'll Make

One of the most widespread mistakes people make is being versatile in what they offer.

Service-based businesses are especially prone to this, and it has devastating consequences.

The story usually goes like this:

I offer web design services, but I’m low on clients and that causes a cashflow problem.

I’m going to also offer related services, like modifying website code, and copywriting, and Aweber integration.

That way I can catch more clients for different types of gigs, and solve my financial problems.”

After that, financial problems tend to spiral right out of control.

Why?

Several reasons:

If you want people to pay you handsomely, you have to excel at what you do. If you want to earn top dollar, you have to be one of the best.

And let me tell you: if you don’t focus 100% of your energy on becoming the best, you won’t become the best. Obviously.

But also: what kind of client do you want to work with?

I don’t know about you, but I prefer my clients to be smart, focused, driven, and poised for success.

To me, that means a client who hires experts for each part of his project, because hey, experts are the best for the job. Right?

So if you offer 7,5 different kinds of service that are only partially related (if at all), your client won’t be the type who hires experts.

He or she will be the type who hires freelancers who learn everything half-ass, because they try to do too many things at the same time.

Logically, a client like that isn’t exactly set up for massive success.

Which means his launch could bomb, his traffic might be untargeted, his funnel might be broken – many things can go wrong.

And if it does go wrong? Then you have a problem, possibly several.

He could blame you even though the work you did isn’t the reason for the lack of results.

He is not likely to come back to you because he probably won’t make enough money to reinvest.

He could even come back to you and try to get a refund, which is just another hassle for you.

Focus. Specialise. Be really amazingly good at one specific thing. A small thing or a big thing, that depends.

Point in case: I could specialise in just email marketing services, but instead my offer is wider: I also write website copy, ads, direct response copy and video sales scripts.

But, it’s all a matter of copywriting services. As soon as a client asks me if I can also set up Mailchimp for them, I refer them to a specialist.

I could do it, but won’t. I specialise. That’s what makes me good at what I do.

And most importantly: it gives my clients the confidence that I don’t muck about with my work, but that instead I give it 100% every day.

Don’t be the guy who sells ice-cream but who will also paint your house.

Be the guy who is THE best housepainter in town, OR be the guy with the richest and creamiest icecream. Not both.

Here’s where I normally place a crafty reference to my work and a link, but it’s late and I’m tired so I hope you’ll forgive me if I just give you the link without further ado.

Just in case you want to hire a sales-driven and highly specialised copywriter: http://martinstellar.com/high-conversion-sales-copy//

Cheers,

Martin

 

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