Values, Morals, Ethics, Money and… Spiritual Integration…???

Of course ‘spiritual integration’ is a made-up word.

Besides, I don’t even know what spirituality actually means, other than maybe a large degree of ‘not-I’ as part of one’s orientation in life.

You know, the notion that others around you and other generations to follow us are more important than our own self-interests.

For me, that’s all the definition of ‘spiritual’ that I need.

But, for many people with a similar view, that totally excludes earning money.

As if money itself is evil.

Well, it isn’t.

Money is just a tool, and the bigger your tool, the bigger the effect it has.

And for a stellar example of that, I take you back to 1755 Lisbon, when an earthquake and tsunami made friends and conspired to wipe out 85 % of the city.

Dreadful.

But because the Marquis of Pombal was fabulously rich, he could afford to rebuild the city in record time.

How’s that for integrating values and ethics with money?

Tools. They rock.

A car is transportation, a hammer is good for building, and a chair is for sitting.

But used wrongly, each of these can be a weapon.

So it really isn’t the tool that’s the problem: it’s what you do with it.

And that means that if you have an important mission, and you do want to change the world, it would really serve your purpose in life if you come to accept money as a tool.

Example?

Hokay.

Let’s say you have a book in you, a really good and important one – a book that can have a massive impact and one that the world must read.

But, you can’t find a publisher for it…

Wouldn’t it be awesome if you had, say, $20K saved up, so that you can self-publish it far and wide, and launch it with a bang?

I’ll say.

But if you refuse to integrate a healthy view of money with your mission, you might perpetually fall short of manifesting that what really matters to you.

In fact, I’ll take it even further:

If your values and views around money are so strong that you don’t want to earn enough to change the world, then actually that’s a selfish attitude.

It would mean that your own values are more important than impacting the world in a meaningful way.

And that doesn’t help anyone, other than your own feeling of self-worth for having such high moral standards.

But you can’t fix the world with broken hands.

You can have a big impact without any money, sure (Oh, hello there Ghandi!)

But if you don’t have a massive audience behind you, you’ll find that you can get a lot more done if you have the space and the funds to invest, so as to amplify and speed up the important work you want to do.

Sometimes, I coach people who struggle with this, and it’s inspiring – massively beautiful – to see someone shift their perception.

When a person goes from fear of possessions to knowing at a very deep level that possessions can create possibilities – that’s so very rewarding.

So yeah, I like my job.

A lot.

What about you: have you managed to integrate money and earning, with the values and morality that makes you you – or are you creating less change than you’d like to because your values hold you back…?

Cheers,

Martin


Also published on Medium.

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