Today’s Your Day

A savvy marketer would make good use of that subject header.

“Today’s your day, because I have a super interesting offer and it might just be for you”.

But nope.

Today is your day because you get to make an offer to other people.

An offer to share in the state you’re in.

It’s a simple exercise, superbly useful for your sales conversations, and it’s called:

Making other people smile.

Think I’m being silly?

Think again:

Smiling feels good.

When people feel good, they find it easier to feel good about themselves.

When they feel good about themselves, they tend to feel good about others, especially the people they’re with.

ESPECIALLY the person who made them smile in the first place.

And if ever you want to sell something – an idea, a product, a different approach – it’s spectacularly important that they feel good about you, and the interaction with you.

And smiles are one of the simplest – and most disarming, non-invasive – ways to do it.

So today is your day to go make people smile, and get better at selling in the process.

Go make the most of it.

Cheers,

Martin


Also published on Medium.

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Martin helped our co-working space get to full occupancy and $25.000 monthly revenue in less than a year.

~ Antonio Herrezuelo,
Avenida Capital

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