Reverse Truth, Trust, Assumptions, Sales

Reverse truth is another way of saying ‘believing in your assumptions’ or ‘taking your hypotheses are verified’.

Aaaand… we all do that, aaaaaall the time.

We observe, we interpret, we conclude. On and on.

In business, and in selling too, that’s deadly.

A client might say “I need help with XYZ’ and you might go “Oh, so they want exactly what I have!”

Do they though? They said they need help, your kind of help – but they didn’t say they *want it from you*.

You’ll only know that for a fact when the money is in or the contract signed.

And when a prospect says ‘yes’ to your offer, that might mean yes literally and the money is on its way – or it might be a false yes, or a way to buy time to think (you’ll have seen it happen, where a client confirms the project, and
then you wonder why they didn’t pay, sign, or indeed reply to your emails any longer).

Reverse truth means that you seek confirmation of what you want to believe or know, and bend that so that it makes sense.

“Well he agrees that he shouldn’t bring home icecream, so obviously that means he won’t. So then why is there a gallon of the stuff in my fridge, dammit?”

That statement can only be made by someone who created a reverse truth. To conclude that one thing means the thing that we want it to mean.

And until you have proof – there is no more icecream showing up in the house, the money is in, the spouse has actually stopped gambling – no assumption should ever be taken as true.

Especially when selling, because people need to trust you if they’re going to buy.

Now, you might think that as long as you’re truthful and operating out of integrity, you don’t damage trust.

But you’d be wrong.

Reverse truth is a terrific way to break trust.

When you seek confirmation where it doesn’t exist, when you take an interpretation as true, you’ll instantly disconnect your buyer from you.

Their reaction (usually subconsciously) will be “Wait, that’s not what I said. I didn’t mean that – this person is not getting me”.

That’s unsettling. ‘I’m not being heard, they don’t get me. Are they listening?”

Bam. Trust crashes.

Reverse truth is dangerous so it’s good to start looking at it.

In what ways, in your day-to-day, do you seek ‘evidence’ to ‘prove’ your assumptions?

Where do you do that in your sales process?

Cheers,

Martin


Also published on Medium.

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