Of Course You Wouldn't Say "I Wrote a Newspaper"

So then why do so many people say ‘I wrote a blog’?

It makes no sense – and what’s worse, incorrect usage of words is devastating for your sales.

I’m a wordguy.

I just love languages, especially English.

And as you would expect, I’m a bit of a puritan.

Still, language is a living thing, which means it evolves.

So we see for example that nouns turn into verbs.

Drives people crazy: “You can’t do that to the language!”

Yes you can. Shakespeare proved it, way back when.

Nouns can, indeed, be verbed. Motions can be tabled, and meetings can be chaired.

But if you use words to sell things, there are limits to what you should and should not do.

Specifically, you should use the appropriate words for things.

You should say what you mean, always.

Because if you don’t, your reader will get confused.

And confusion means there is no sale.

A confused mind doesn’t buy

One fine example is the word blog.

Lately I see it all the time.

Someone writes ‘I wrote a blog about abc’.

No, they didn’t.

What they wrote is called a blog post. Or an article. Or a piece, if
you like.

A blog (short for web-log) is a place where articles or posts are published.

To say you wrote a blog would be the same thing as saying ‘I wrote a newspaper’.

Nobody in his right mind would say that.

And yet, it’s completely common these days.

Maybe you think I’m being pedantic about language, but I’m not.

Like I said: If there’s confusion, there’s no sale.

And you better believe that it’s easy – real easy – to confuse people.

Which is a pity: You work hard to drive traffic, you blog (heh) and you engage on social media…

And when people come to your site, they see language that doesn’t actually say what you’re trying to make it say.

Traffic = gone.

The sale? Lost.

You can’t afford that. Especially on salespages (where the sale is supposed to happen).

So if you want sales copy that is both persuasive AND correct, go here to get yourself some: www.martinstellar.com/copywriting-services/

Guaranteed not to confuse the reader.

Cheers,

Martin

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