How to Sell Art if You Don't Want to Deal With Blogs and Social Media

Had a coaching session with a German artist yesterday.

She’s got 35 years of painting stashed away in her studio.

Canvas, paper, oils and pastels and watercolours – probably 500 works or more.

I asked her what’s her goal – what does she want.

“To be more visible, have wider reach.

“My work sells well to Scandinavian people but there aren’t too many in Spain.”

She went on to tell me she doesn’t like digital media, or the internet, never reads blogs, and generally shuns everything that’s not real-world, hands-on stuff.

Normally, you’d think she’s screwed – yes the art world has changed and yes the internet has given all of us a publishing platform.

Yes, we can all build our own audience.

But what if you don’t like the internet, and you don’t want to use social media?

Then you’re done for, right? No choice but to stay with the galleries?

No sir.

The trick is to realise that social media are a *social* venue.

With a digital format, but it’s inherently a social place, where people go to meet and share and have conversations.

So if you don’t like the online platforms, why not just take your social interactions into the real world?

The internet is useful, sure. But it’s not the be-all and end-all.

This lady – Helga is her name – loves talking about her work.

She’s a bright and fun person, passionate and a good listener.

In other words: a perfect social person.

And she loves literature, and she knows a lot about it.

So I told her: “Why not join a reader’s group that gets together weekly, and get to know those people?”

Not in order to find buyers – you don’t expect that when you join a club, nor should you expect that when you join social media.

No, the point is to meet people, to interact, have conversations, and to add people into your network who like you, like your work, and care about what you do.

People like you, who resonate with you.

You know: make friends. Like you can do on social media, if that’s your thing.

Because when you do that, and one day you say: “I have a viewing (or an exhibition) coming up, want to come?” those people will support you and gladly so.

And they’ll bring their friends, and you get bums in seats.

At the event of course you ask people if they want to be updated by email, and you take down their details.

You grow your list, and you can stay in touch with the new and bigger network.

By email – or by phone or snail mail, if you can’t even bring yourself to write an email.

And when you do, people will keep taking note, keep showing up, keep bringing more people, and some of those will buy from you.

See, I like to hack systems, be inventive, creative, find solutions and workarounds.

Meaning, if there’s a goal (i.e. building your list and communicating with them because that’s the only way to have a business), there’s all kinds of ways to do it.

And there’s no golden solution, no silver bullet or magic pill.

What works for one person is the wrong solution for another.

So find your own way, build your own system.

You’re an artist, aren’t you?

You create stuff.

So, roll your own if the standard methods don’t work for you.

Create it just the way you want.

The goal is to build a list.

For that you need to ‘catch fish’.

And to do that, you need to ‘go where the fish are’.

In other words, find a place where the right people congregate, and become part of the group.

Be valuable, likeable, and be yourself – and never miss an opportunity to either ask for their support or indeed to take down their names, whenever you see there’s an interest in what you do.

Now obviously, email marketing is an excellent method for communicating with potential buyers.

Not the only way, but I consider it the best for the kind of person I am – and it’s fun, free, and easy.

It works for me (and a ton of other people) because I like the process of writing and creating something to bring value to people.

If you’re like that too, then I can help you and show you how it’s done.

Details here –> http://martinstellar.com/starship-mentorprise-writing-coach/

Cheers,

Martin

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