Here You Go: Some Advice I'm Not Qualified to Give

I’m not a parent.

As such, I have little right to tell parents what’s right and wrong.

But, I know a few things about psychology, and with that I can see that some parents are doing damage without being aware of it.

And, there’s a sales lesson in it, so read on even if you don’t have children.

I just watched Jimmy Kimmel’s April fool’s day video.

In case you don’t know: Mr. K. is an American talkshow host, with a sense of humor and a finger on the pulse of hip and social.

He asked people to send in videos of their best April fool’s pranks.

The first few clips were ok.

Then came a little girl at a breakfast table, crying.

Mummy asking: “Are you upset I froze your cereal?”

The kid lifts her spoon, an icicle of cereal at the end of it. Crying, obviously.

“It’s just April fool’s day”.

Kid cries more and walks off camera.

 

Freeze frame.

 

What happened there is a basic human assumption.

And, it’s an erroneous assumption: thinking that the other person can relate and understand on our own level

When dealing with kids, it means you won’t get understood, and the child won’t have the learning experience you intend.

In business, the assumption costs you sales

That little girl, she went through an experience that at her age makes no sense. She doesn’t have the rational understanding of what a prank is, or what April fool’s day means.

That’s not education – that’s just making them suffer, thinking it builds character.

Which it might, and it might not. Depends on many things, including further education and personality type of the little girl.

But it’s not necessary, and it’s a fact that before that girl even understands what April fool’s day is about, she’s had the hurt first.

Which may put her off of April fool’s for years, maybe life. And pranks in general. Who knows.

It sure showed her that mummy can not always be trusted to put yummy breakfast on the table.

And I can’t get myself to see that realisation as a healthy aspect of rearing a youngster.

 

But anyway, like I said: I’m not a parent. Anyone with a pedagogic background is welcome to correct me.

So let’s loop it back to business: if you don’t speak at the level of understanding your prospect has, he or she will not get the message.

Just like with that girl, the emotional reaction you trigger will be not at all what you intend for, nor will it facilitate trust, let alone a sale.

We all do this. We assume prior knowledge, or instant understanding, in other people.

We talk to them as if they’re in tune with how we ourselves see the world.

They’re not, trust me.

Nobody sees the world like you do, they couldn’t.

 

So if you want to reach people, get a message across, teach something or allow for a sale, make sure you speak at the level of understanding your listener has

Basic psychology and pedagogics.

And, inherently effective when you have something you’d like people to buy.

Also effective is, of course, writing daily emails.

On that note: am I seeing more subscribers writing more emails? Joanne?

That just rocks, it makes me so happy.

 

If you write emails: keep it up. You’re in for the long haul, but it’s going to pay off.

If you’re not: man you really want to get started.

Daily emails really are miraculous: they build and audience, get you fanmail, they pick your kids up from school, it gets you sales, makes its own sauce, it mowes your lawn and lasts a lifetime, comes with batteries and easy assembly instructions, it turns customers into ambassadors –

Oh come on. Just write emails. It works.

And if you need help, get me here –> http://www.martinstellar.com/starship-mentorprise-writing-coach/

Cheers,

Martin

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