Cool: Fine Example of a Sales-Getting Art Email

You may remember me talking about my client Jimmy Kelly, the artist from Dublin whom I visited last July.

He’s been steadily chipping away at his daily emails, and the other day he sent one that clearly shows he’s crossed an important boundary.

Where at the start he was unsure, hesitant to sell – let alone ask for the sale – these days things are different.

Behold, an art-selling email done absolutely right:

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Subject header: Natural Questions

It’s natural to question the value of your activities. At the moment I’m posing myself questions, but they are good questions. Namely, what value does original art add to a home?

Not life or death I know and I’m almost ashamed to admit only a person living in a first world environment would be bothered with such a concern. But let’s address it.

It really depends on the person. For some original art is a luxury, just another thing to be acquired in a world of acquisitions.

For others it could very well mean the difference between the will to keep going or just grinding to a halt. It’s an inspiration and a well of deep meaning.

What we put in is what we draw out. People find meaning in the strangest of places and in unimaginable ways. Art seems up there at the top for the most part.

I would not like to see Art as being at the centre of a home but I think it could readily be a centerpiece in a room. A tabernacle of sorts that continually draws eyes to its apex.

The room is decorated in accordance with the piece not vice versa, and of course it is a talking point.

It tells an important part of the homeowner’s story. Where they acquired the piece, their relationship with the artist, and what they saw that no one else did, which meant they just had to have it.

An emotional connection had been forged.

This is just a launching pad for such musings. I’m sure there will be more, shared and unshared.

The question simply won’t go away. It’s central really. How do you add value to people’s lives via your art? We intuit that it’s closely related to how it adds value first to ours.

While we are ruminating, journey over to here, the gallery, and allow your eyes to wander with that question in mind.
Have a good one.

Jimmy

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See what he did there?

Sure it could be improved – everything can be made better.

The subject header, for example: he could have made that live more, making it a bit more shocking to increase open rates.

But the email itself?

Pretty brilliant, I’d say.

The most important thing he did right?

It’s about THEM – the reader, the art lover, the potential buyer.

IN short order, he lists all kinds of benefits of owning an original piece.

Really talking to the emotional world of an art buyer, outlining various imortant reasons to buy art.

And, he does it after asking some pretty important questions.

An email like that is something that the right kind of reader – one who likes your work and is interested in one day buying – simply can’t ignore.

These questions, the benefits, they’ll ruminate around their minds like an earworm, for days on end.

And that’s what you want to achieve when communicating with potential buyers – whether it’s in a daily email, or a Facebook update, or a direct email you send in reply to a question.

You want that person to feel that your interest is in them benefiting from the purchase.

Nice work, I like it.

The call to action?

Pretty well-handled too: Not pushy, yet directive, and fully relevant to the story before it.

Just goes to show what you can achieve with some learning, some dedicated practice, and of course the right mindset.

And speaking of mindset: if you want to change yours, specifically when it comes to charging what your work is worth…

Then you just might want to consider signing up in time for the December issue of the LEAP Marketing Newsletter, because that one is going to be all about pricing and earning well from your work.

And it’s that newsletter where Jimmy got a good deal of his present-day sales smarts.

Access here –> http://martinstellar.com/leap-to-more-sales/

Cheery Sunday,

Martin

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