One Simple and Effective 'Trick' to Cause an Emotional Response in First-Time Visitors

Got a little instructional for you today.

Yesterday, a reader responded to my call ‘hit reply and tell me where you struggle’.

Always nice to hear back from people – do keep ’em coming.

She told me a bit about her struggles, and ended with ‘this is my site, please have a look’.
so I did, and I liked what I saw.

But there was one important thing missing:

She didn’t have a tagline.

In the header it stated her name, but that was all.

And because of that, she misses out on an enormously powerful emotional effect.

I call it resonance: when someone is exposed to your message, or your website, and something in them ‘clicks’, and goes: “Huh, I like that”.

That short moment right at the start, is powerful, useful and important.

Without it, a visitor might just poke around the site a bit.

With it, they might do the same, but they’ll do so while being in a more engaged, more joyous emotional state.

And while the difference may be slight depending on the person, it does increase the chance of them spending more time, reading more, seeing more of your paintings, or even signing up.

I like to think of the tagline as a 10-word artist’s statement.

A short, pithy message that’s personal, shows your passion, demonstrates your why, and reaches into the viewer’s mind with to see if there’s anything it can connect with.

It’s not that hard to write one.

Here’s how, starting with the don’ts:

First, don’t be strictly factual: “Johnny Johnson, watercolour artist’ says what’s in the tin, but it has no pulling power, it doesn’t push any emotional buttons.

Second, don’t try to be clever. We’re talking about communications here, so no nifty wordsmithery.

Next up, the dos:

Take a sheet of paper, and quickly start writing short descriptive sentences about yourself, your art, your passion or your techniques.

List 100.

Don’t overthink it, do NOT second-guess or judge their usefulness – what we’re looking for at this stage is a brain dump.

Just write as many as you can, as fast as you can.

You probably won’t reach 100 at fist go, but that’s ok.

It can take days or even weeks to get the perfect tagline together, all part of the process.

Carry a notepad or index cards (my fav) with you, and any time during your day that an idea comes up, jot it down to later add to the list.

Once you have 100 of them (you’ll find that parts of some statements will be duplicates, and that’s fine), you’re done with the strictly creative part of the exercise, and you can get more rational about it.

In other words, you put on your editor’s cap.

You’ll quickly see that most of them aren’t all that great or useful, so you just cross those out.

Whittle down until you have some ten or twenty good contenders, and copy those over to a new sheet of paper.

Btw, I think the best way to do this is by writing it in longhand, on paper.

Writing by hand activates different areas in the brain, compared to typing, and that’s useful for the kind of process we’re talking about.

So now you have 10 or 20 an a new sheet, and again, you take an axe to the ones that aren’t ideal or perfect.

Narrow down to the five best ones, and copy those to yet another sheet.

Then you take the best bits of those five, and mix & match the words that have the most emotional appeal, are most relevant and to the point, and you scramble the words, concepts and meanings together until you’re left with one simple, 5 to 10 word sentence that basically says:

Who you are, what you do, why you do it, why it matters.

You stick it in your site header beneath your brand name or your own name, and you’re done.

From that moment on, each time a new visitor lands on your site, they’ll not just see your name, but instantly they’ll also read your micro-artist’s statement.

And if they’re the right kind of person for what you do, something in them will perk up and recognise it.

A useful exercise, not just for your site to be more effective, but very likely for your own mind as well.

Highly recommended.

Also recommended: the LEAP Newsletter. Details here –> http://martinstellar.com/leap-to-more-sales/

Cheers,

Martin

Lessons From the Masters: Write Drunk, Edit Sober – BUT…

…just don’t drink when you write.

According to popular lore, Ernest Hemingway said a writer should write drunk and edit sober.

There are two problem with this.

The first is that according to his daughter, he never said those words.

Secondly, it’s an instruction that should not be taken literally.

What good writers understand it to mean is that you should write AS IF drunk.

Meaning: unfettered and uninhibited.

Or, as James Chartrand of MenWithPens fame said: Write shitty first drafts.

Reason being that if you try to edit your writing as you go about creating the first draft, you keep stalling yourself.

Second-guessing what you’re putting on paper is disastrous to your creativity.

I’ve mentioned this before in the context of the three writer’s identities, and I’ve talked about it in interviews.

(If you’ve not heard them, hit reply and I’ll send you a link).

Writing can be really simple, and really fast.

IF you write *as if* drunk.

Or in other words, write fast, write lyrically, spew all your ideas out and get as crazy as you want.

Nobody will read your first draft anyway, so why force yourself to create a good first draft?

You’re going to go straight into to editing it, so it makes no sense at all to mix the two tasks.

Once you get this, the very moment you discover how to write without involving your rational mind, it’s like a veil is removed, and you’ll be amazed at the torrential flow of creativity that you can let flow.

At will, whenever you like. You start writing, and within 20 or 30 minutes – BAM.

A draft that’s so rife with ideas and content that all you need to do is clean it up, delete a bunch of mess, and hit send.

There you go: a professional writer’s trick for writing fast ‘n good emails, articles, status updates, blog posts, what have you.

You can even write a whole novel in a month with this strategy, plenty of people pulling it off regularly.

Oh btw, there’s a reader named Maria I mentioned the other day – she caught the daily email bug last week, and she’s been at it daily.

Yesterday she showed me her ‘from now on I’ll write every single day’ intro piece, and it was pretty dang good.

Lyrical, even.

I’ll send you a link later on today.

Meanwhile, go here if you want me to show you the psychological tricks of writing emails that get you sales –> http://martinstellar.com/starship-mentorship-writing-coach/

Cheers,

Martin

When You're Green You Grown, When You're Ripe You Rot. Choose Which

School’s not ever out, you know.

Not if you want to go places.

Erika Napoletana said it nicely, a few years back:

Something to the effect that if the economy is hurting you, you need to add a new skillset.

I mentioned it to a friend at the time, a single mother social media manager with two or three kids. (I can never keep track of offspring, probably because I don’t have any.)

And no, sorry, I don’t want any. Maybe if you ask the next Stellar.

Told my friend:

“There’s lots to learn you know, you can follow any online course you want, and it’ll help.”

Retorted she: “I don’t need no stinking course – I need more clients and more money coming in.”

Upon which she went back to Flakebook to whinge about how bad her clients were, how empty her bank account, and how bad the economy.

Yes, I know.

So in my best Dr. House impersonation: Idiots!

You’re not like that – are you?

Good, good to hear.

So, here’s a skillset for you to learn: becoming a proficient email marketer.

Yes, I have a course for that which you can buy.

But if you’re smart, and a self starter, and you know how to apply yourself and a little discipline, you can do it on your own too.

Just do it. Seriously.

Here’s my 30-day challenge for you:

Each day, reserve the first 30 minutes of your day for an email draft.

Don’t worry about content, or quality, or messaging: just write, as fast a you can.

Write anything.

We’re just practicing here, just doing reps.

Training the writing muscle.

Write “Write” over and over again if you can’t get started, until other words come up, and you’re off to the races.

Once a week, take the one that’s most fun and most useful, and finish it up and send to your list.

Good chance that before the month is out, you’ll have trained your writing muscle to the point that you’ll be sending more than just one of the daily drafts.

Keep LEAP rule #1 in mind though: make it fun. Enjoy it, write something that makes you smile.

If you don’t enjoy writing it, nobody will enjoy reading it, so focus on fun.

Capice?

Good.

3

2

1

GO!

Meanwhile, here’s where you can get my personal and direct help if you’re seriously serious about learning and expanding your mind –> http://martinstellar.com/starship-mentorprise-writing-coach/

Cheery-bye

Martin

Starship Mentorprise: Coaching at the Speed of Write

An email came in last week:
“Martin, I need better copy but I don’t have the budget to buy from you. Do you offer mentoring services, so I can improve my own writing?”

Smart. Always good to learn from an expert.

Truth is, while I’ve helped many people over the years, it’s always been part of a larger project – I’ve never offered teaching or mentoring as a separate offer.
Just never thought of it.

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How Not to Write an Article or Blog Post

Sauntered over to Twitter just now.

Saw a link by someone who usually shares good stuff, so I clicked.

Landed on a blog post.

It opened thusly:

“It’s like this, you see”.

Now, I’m all for conversational writing.

I commend personal style.

But if you’re going to write something, do it in a way that makes people actually read the stuff.

 

How do you get people to read you?

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Weekly Free Copy Review, Starting Today. Check it Out, Submit Your Copy

The other day I asked my readers to submit their copy for a free review.

Got some interesting reactions, and I think it’s something I should do weekly.

So if you want me to review your copy, just hit reply and tell me the link where I can see it.

I’ll only do one each week, and I’ll choose based only on what I think is the most interesting example for my readers.

So here goes, the first of my weekly free copy critique.

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Of Course You Wouldn't Say "I Wrote a Newspaper"

So then why do so many people say ‘I wrote a blog’?

It makes no sense – and what’s worse, incorrect usage of words is devastating for your sales.

I’m a wordguy.

I just love languages, especially English.

And as you would expect, I’m a bit of a puritan.

Still, language is a living thing, which means it evolves.Continue Reading

Content Marketing, Learning, Evolution and Intelligence

If you look at things like this video, you’d think that technology is all bad. Oh my, how disconnected from reality we all are, right? (In case you’re at work or don’t have the time to watch: It’s a slam-poet dishing out an intelligent, well-built and touching view on the world we live in, and the way technology is changing it – and us.)

He makes a lot of good points. Our experience of the world is fast being stripped of things that used to be important.

Touch. Interaction. Hugs. Real-life friendships. It’s all so digital these days, isn’t it?

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We're All Making a Ding in the Universe

I live by smiles. For me a smile is a means to an end, because it makes me feel better and it makes me more pleasant to be around.

It’s also a result. Notably, smiles are the result of what I consider healthy thinking.

Imagine an empty, white room. It may be beautiful, but it’s empty and it’s white.

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A Friendly Open Question For Clay Collins

I like Clay Collins. I think he’s very smart, funny and helpful, and I’ve learned a lot from him, and still do. That’s why I’m subscribed to his marketing show and that’s why I received the email that ultimately led to this post – and hopefully to a bit of friendly debate.

Clay Did Something I Didn’t Really Like – And it Confused Me. A LOT.

Last week, an email notification flashed across my screen, announcing a message from Clay. Subject header: ‘Hater’.

Now, I’m a guy who lives and dies by the power of words – quite literally. I also like to philosophise about things like ethics, psychology and semantics, amongst a bunch of other things.

As such, the word ‘hate’ is one that I rarely, if ever, use.

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