BIG Words: Moral and Ethical Duties and Such…

There are people out there who need you.

Really need you.

 

So if you have something for sale that can truly solve problems, I consider it your moral and ethical duty to make that known to those people who have the problems you can solve.

 

You are able to help others?

Then dude and/or chica, get off your couch, and get yourself in front of others please, quick-smart. Seriously.

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How to Become the Highlight of Your Reader's Day

Got a sweet email from a reader yesterday, which included these lines:

“Looking forward to reading your articles and mails. They do make my day.

All the best,

Mary”

 

Think about that for a moment.

I send emails almost every single day, so you’d expect people to be bothered, right?

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What Comes First: The Product, or the Marketing? (Not what you think)

Seems like people are still getting the basics wrong, even though I’ve written about it before.

Sometimes it’s like nobody is paying attention to me.

I’m talking to you, Sandra Bullock.

Anyway, had a conversation about a mutual friend:

“Martin, this is what she should do. She should offer a this, and build a that, and then sell that to people. It’s perfect!”

Yep, it’s perfect.

But it didn’t answer my favorite question:

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The Real, Prehistoric Reason Stories Work so Well in Marketing and Sales

 

Ever heard the term ‘storyselling’?

It’s sounds hip, modern, new and fresh, but in reality it’s an example of old wine in new bags.

There’s nothing new about marketing or selling by way of telling stories.

In fact, humans have done it for centuries.

Stories are the fabric of society.

 

It’s called ‘the oral tradition’, and that refers to an époque in human evolution where script didn’t exist, much less the printing press.

No, back when we were coming out of the trees (or crawling up the beaches, depending on your politics), we used the spoken word for keeping our history alive, and for transmitting the rules and customs of society.

This we did for thousands upon thousands of years.

We’d huddle around a fire, listening to the tribal leader, our parents, or travelers from far off places.

We’d listen, memorize, and re-tell.

For thousands of years.

 

By contrast, the printing press was only invented some 600 years ago. Before that time, literacy only existed among clergy, and to some extent among nobility.

All the rest, the normal people, they’d get their dose of news, of rule, of history and religion, by listening to

stories.

Stories about great kings who won or lost battles, stories about saints and apostles, stories about great cataclysms and sunken cities…

 

Stories are, and have been for centuries, the very fabric of life, society and individual psychology.

 

Look at it this way: when you’re alone, driving, under the shower, walking your dog, and you let your mind stray… what does it do?

It tells itself stories.

What you should have said to your boss yesterday, what you should do first when you get home, how to plan your day tomorrow… it’s all stories in some way or other.

Our mind is continuously running a film inside your head, complete with sounds, feelings, smells, memories.

It’s so old, it’s genetic.

 

So what do smart marketers do?

They tap into that natural, fundamentally human and constantly active mechanism.

Instead of letting a person think out his own story, we sit down and say: “Hey listen, can I tell you a story?”

And just like our ancestors have done for millennia, they go ‘“Sure, yeah”

Attention: gotten.

The moral of the story (heh):

Talk to your people, tell them stories.

They need, want to, long to hear you talk to them.

You can’t ever bore them or upset them if you keep telling them interesting stories.

 

Stories grab attention, engage, build trust, teach, and ultimately: get you more sales.

If that sounds good, I’ll write the stories and the sales pitches to go with it for you. Go here to find out the details –> http://martinstellar.com/high-conversion-sales-copy/

 

Cheers,

 

 

Martin

 

 

This is Making Me Nervous, but it Should Be Good for Sales

I’ve just finished writing a piece that I’m not sure I should publish.

It’s… charged.

Aside from the business lessons, there’s also sex in it.

Not a lot, but still.

For a good educational reason, but still.

It makes me feel apprehensive.

 

I know that this is a good feeling.

It’s the right kind of nervous.

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Can I Be Your Sharona?

It’s uncanny how much sales are like dating.

But not like dating that cute guy at the deli.

Sales are more like dating a caveman, a neanderthal.

A person who goes through life trained to spot risks and dangers.

A prospect sees himself constantly, potentially, at risk in a pervasively hostile environment, just like human beings in prehistoric times

To someone looking to buy, every offer could be a lemon – gotta be careful, right?

Of course these days we no longer fear thunder, or predators, or eating a poisonous plant.

But we still need to be protected from our environment:

Muggers, scammers, ISP’s, traffic, falling ladders and shrimp-gone-off – all kinds of things can be a hazard to us.

 

To protect us from that, we have the lizard brain.

 

The lizard brain sniffs out details in our environment that are too small or too fleeting for us to perceive consciously.

That time you slammed on the breaks and just barely avoided hitting the car in front of you?

That was because your lizard brain perceived a risk, and effected a safety response instantly – all before your mind even registered that the car in front of you was breaking.

You sniff at the overdate jar of sauce, and it smells fine.

But you distrust it anyway and drop it in the bin.

Your lizard brain just protected you from food poisoning.

Redundantly perhaps – but in a hostile environment, it’s better to be safe than sorry.

Very useful, this lizard brain.

Terrible for sales though: people are constantly on the lookout for a reason not to trust us

Unless of course, you know how to work with it.

Once you realize that a prospect is constantly and actively looking for reasons not to trust your offer, you can behave in ways that show people, over time, that you’re alright, that you can be trusted.

 

Like Sharona is doing very cleverly.

Sharona is a girl here in town, and she’s madly in love with Grog, my pet caveman.

But Grog is used to simply dragging a female to his cave by the hair – he doesn’t know what all this love malarky is about.

To him, a smile is a sign of aggression.

Someone wanting to touch his arm is perceived as an attack, and moving in for a kiss is just right out of the question.

He no longer drags women by the hair though, I made him stop that. I’m very persuasive.

 

Sharona is clever – she’s basically using the strategy of email marketing to win his trust.

Each day when Grog and I go out for a walk, she’s there on the same park bench.

She’s patient, persistent and consistent: she’s there every day, just so he can get used to her presence and get to trust her in his own time

She doesn’t ask for his attention, she doesn’t expect him to notice her – she just shows up, every day.

The result is that Grog’s lizard brain gets used to her.

She’s becoming a permanent fixture in his surroundings.

And each time he sees her she’s just sat there – not threatening, not demanding – Not salesy.

Just there, showing up, a pretty sight.

And he’s getting used to her. Getting to like her.

And I think it’s beginning to work: this morning before going out, I noticed he was picking the rabbit bones out of his beard and combing his chest fur.

I’m pretty sure that within a week or two, he’ll want to hunt a wild animal and offer it to her.

 

What this means for your business:

 Talk to your list – every day if you can

Be like Sharona: Consistently present, a fixture in the lives of your prospects and customers.

Show up consistently, a pretty sight or a useful message.

People get used to you, they’ll start liking you for the simple fact that you’re there to stay.

They see you mean business and are committed to it, and that builds trust.

And trust breeds sales.

 

Ready for more trust and more sales? Then I’ll write those emails for you – daily, weekly, bi-weekly – whatever works for your budget and your business model.

 

Let me be your Sharona.

 

Whatever the details may look like, the result is always singular: more sales and more money in the bank.

Here’s the how and the why –> http://martinstellar.com/high-conversion-sales-copy/

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

More sales, killer productivity, more time off and happier clients. And Sandra Bullock

…as you sip Pina Colada on a yacht in the Pacific while playing chess with Richard Branson, to the backdrop of Kate Winslet and Emma Watson dancing by the pool.

And Sandra Bullock – she’s cute.

 

Obviously, I jest.

But this one thing I’m about to show you will make a big difference in getting closer to whatever your dream is.

It’s a bit longer than my normal emails, but it’ll be worth it.

If you make it to the end I’m sharing a gem of a mind-trick with you.

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Can I Slam You With a Claudio? Also: My Pet Caveman

 

Right, back to business.

Because if my friend Claudio would be able to speak right now, he’d scold me, and very harshly so.

 

“I have run this bar for 20 years, Martin.

20 years, and I’ve never, ever, had a day off.

I’m here each night.

Never a holiday.

Because if I don’t show up, people find a closed door and I wouldn’t even *have* a business.

And you, Martin, you close shop just because I’m in hospital?

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Exclamation Marks Are Illegal. Here's Why

Reviewed a website for a client last week.

On the about page, she did something fun and effective: it was simply a bullet list of statements about herself.

Smart, really. Makes it a fun, punchy read.

The copy was good too: relevant, fun, interesting.

But she ended each line with an exclamation mark – and that’s just absolutely deadly.

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Deadly Questions: 'Oh yeah?' and 'So what?'

Whatever you write whenever you communicate with people, never allow for either of those questions to pop up.
The moment your listener thinks that, you’ve lost him.

Just received a reply from a client, after sending him his first Mentorprise copy critique review:

“Crikey, there’s a lot in there!”

Yep, there is.

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