They Need You

Whether you’re a coach, a CEO, an artist or speaker or author or inventor:

People need you.

That’s why you get paid (be it in fees or salary) to show up and do your work.

In other words, there’s demand for what you bring.

And, it’s incumbent upon you (and every other professional) to supply and bring that thing.

And if you’re then also someone with a purpose, who does their work because it makes a difference, marketing, promoting and selling go from ‘necessary evil’ to something you can do with pride.

After all, they need you – and nobody is going to search in order to find the needle (i.e. you) in the haystack (the marketplace for your kind of work).

No, it’s up to you to show up and be findable.

That’s how people who need you get to have what you do.

That way you fulfill the purpose you do it for, and that’s how you make the money too.

And that purpose can be anything you want – it doesn’t have to be ‘end world hunger’ or ‘invent the next generation of batteries for Tesla’.

Whether you create inclusive workplaces, or sing with Alzheimer patients, or run PR campaigns for social enterprises, or teach maths, or coach entrepreneurs on servant-leadership: you’ve got a purpose and it’s valid (and I do hope you know what yours is).

Work for that purpose, show up to the people who need you, and:

Discover your own best, most fun, true-to-values method for growing your influence, business, revenue, and impact.

Because if we don’t manage to sell, those who need us don’t get our work.

And if that happens, there’s a harsh question to ask:

Are we serving our purpose?

That’s why I teach and coach on business and sales.

Because folk like us, we do this thing we do for a purpose.

It’s our job to serve that purpose and that requires getting good at enrolling people in our work.

That’s how we get to serve our purpose.

And if that resonates and you’re ready to scale up, let’s talk and see what we can do.

Cheers,

Martin

Doing the Next Thing Right vs Doing the Right Next Thing

I forget where it was, but the other day I read about the ‘difference between doing the next thing right, and doing the right next thing’.

There’s so much to contemplate in there!

Of course, it’s always a good idea to the the next thing right. Kaizen, improvement, measure&iterate… if you want to go places, it’s important to do things right.

But that ‘doing the next right thing’ – that’s a really astute way to describe what my work is about:

Helping entrepreneurs do the right things, and in such a way that everyone gets better and money gets made.

That’s what an ethical business is about, if you get to the heart of it: doing the right things.

And that’s why I so much love this ethical sales coaching I do.

Because once you figure out what is the next right thing, and you’re able to select the next profitable right thing, that’s when buyers enroll themselves.

Because if you make ‘the next profitable right thing to do’ a returning issue in your business, everything will get infused with not just the idea or intention, but the actual action of doing the right things.

That causes massive change – in how you operate, how your team treats their work, the way your buyers respond… it’ll shift things, across the board.

Make ‘the right thing’ your goal, and all the right people will start to fall in love with your brand.

And if you choose the profitable right thing to do, they’ll give you money as well.

It’s fun, and it’s perfect for people who live by values.

Want to have a look and see what profitable right things you could do, to grow your revenue and impact?

Then this link gets you in my calendar: https://app.acuityscheduling.com/schedule.php?owner=11652475&appointmentType=544906

Cheers,

Martin

Ten Rules for Ethical Selling, #3: Prevent the Sale

“But wait! Don’t we want the sale?”

Yep, we want the sale. I sure do, and I hope you as well.

Except when we learn that buying wouldn’t be the right choice for the buyer.

And that’s where you see the difference between ethical sellers, and who only care about the numbers.

Selling is a way to facilitate a decision-making process, and if a buyer is about to make the wrong decision?

Then it’s not just a friendly respectful thing to stop the sale: it’s your duty.

If they ought not buy, they should not buy. That’s how you sell with the other’s best interest in mind, and that’s how you build the trust that causes people to come back to buy later on, when the time is right for them and it IS a good decision.

And that’s why, when I talk to new people, I’m not there to sell. That’s not my job.

My job is to help you figure out what’s the best decision – for you.

Because that ultimately is the best decision for me as well.

So… been on the fence about talking, because you might want help but you’re not sure?

Then let’s meet, have a conversation, and see what’s the best decision for you.

Book a call here

Cheers,

Martin

Everything That’s Wrong With Marketing and Sales, in One Handy Sentence

The other day I saw a salespage for some new thing that Tony Robbins is doing – I forget the details, but it’s some sort of programme designed to help people start mastermind groups, or something like that.

So far, so good: a mastermind group is a fantastic tool in the life of any business professional, and everyone should be in one. Seriously.

But somewhere on the page, it read:

“Social Pressure – This is going to be one of the biggest launches in history with more hype leading up to it then ever before. And people are going to be afraid to miss out on this new wave of opportunity.”

Well, yuck. Made me feel like I needed a shower.

Because that single line describes perfectly why marketing and sales have such a bad reputation.

I mean, come on Tony: Hype? Afraid to miss out? New wave of opportunity?

Oh sure, it’s effective marketing. Hype works.

And it’s effective selling too: Painting a ‘wave of opportunity’ reels people in, and pushing scarcity buttons and triggering fear of missing out, that works too.

But it’s scuzzy, manipulative, and in my monkly opinion: highly unethical.

Marketing and sales campaigns like that, they prey on the gullible. It’s designed to coerce people into buying something – not because they actually need it, but because there’s an artificial sense of need being created in the buyer. It’s manipulation.

Now while I’m sure Tony is a good guy, nice to his grandma and so on, I’ve never taken to his work… too much hype, too much stage antics – but hey, if people get better from his work, it’s not my place to complain. Generally.

But seeing this? Bleh. What a turnoff.

Selling – done right and done ethically – doesn’t need any hype, or ‘wave of opportunity’ or fear of missing out.

Selling done right means you serve a buyer in making a yes/no decision – based on actual – not manufactured – need.

So if you have an actual, current need for growing your sales, business, impact, and revenue… and a sales coach might help?

Then why not reply, and we’ll set up a time to talk.

We’ll take 20 minutes for a strategy call, to see if we’re a match.

And I promise: 100% hype-free.

Let me know…

Cheers,

Martin

If They’re Going to Buy… Shouldn’t It Be From You, Instead of From the Scoundrels and the Greedy?

It’s easy to cast blame for all the ways that commerce and capitalism do damage.

Society and the environment sure don’t get better from the way Facebook treats users, or the way  some companies pollute our world.

But if you’re in business and you’re here to make a difference, it doesn’t make sense to cast blame – whether you blame marketing, or capitalism, or commerce, or corporatism, or money:

None of those are the actual problem.

They’re all agnostic of right & wrong.

They’re just tools to be used in order to further a mission.

The type of mission determines whether you’re helping, or hurting things.

And how you use those tools is what makes for right or wrong.

And they’re powerful tools, too – so more than ever, the world needs good eggs – people like you – picking up the tools, and doing something good with them.

Because if you don’t, others will, and it’s plain to see that a lot of those others do not have the ethics and integrity as people like us do.

So you can dislike money or selling or capitalism all you want: if you don’t pick them up and do something good with them, others will – and you have no control over how those others go about their business.

But the buyer will buy – from you or from the other.

Shouldn’t it be you though?

That’s why, if you want to do something good, the best thing you can do is get good at being in business, sign on more clients – and scale up your impact.

Increase your slice of the pie for a good purpose, so that others without purpose, are left with a smaller pie.

Making sure that buyers buy from you, and not from the scoundrels and the greedy:

Sounds like a pretty good reason to grow your enterprise, if you ask me.

So: if right now you’re positioned for growth, you’re getting opportunities, but too often the sale doesn’t happen, let’s talk.

Helping entrepreneurs driven by purpose to create more clients is what I do, and I’d love to explore how we can get you to grow, sell more, and increase your impact.

Reply to this email and we’ll set up a time for a short call, to see what can be done.

Cheers,

Martin

Ten Rules for Ethical Selling, #2: Invite, Don’t Close

‘Closing a sale’ is fun, of course. Everybody likes to land a new client and earn the money.

But there’s a reason why in my LEAP framework for ethical selling, the 9th pillar isn’t ‘the close’, but:

The Open.

I know, English doesn’t work that way – but it’s how *I* work, and you’d do really well to try it.

Don’t close a sale – open a door.

Invite a buyer into a new phase in their life or business.

Invite them, open the door, to start a new type of relationship with you.

You’ll find that plenty people are more than willing to buy, so long as we don’t try to pull them or push them through the door.

Nobody likes being told what to do, everybody’s autonomy is sacred, and therefore the most damaging thing you can do is coerce, persuade, or otherwise leave the other person feeling as if they’re being told what’s good for them.

Nobody likes that, and the feeling is super easy to trigger.

So instead, hand people their autonomy.

Lead with the no. Invite it, even.

Give people the right to veto and be explicit about it.

“Hey tell me if this isn’t for you, but I could see programme XYZ make short shrift of the problem you’ve described. Shall we talk about implementing it?”

Look at how that feels: the other is completely allowed to say no, they’re being asked to make a choice, of their own volition, to engage in a deeper conversation, and the seller pre-empts the entire autonomy issue by leading with no.

If you want buyers to move towards you and enroll themselves, invite, don’t close.

If you get it right, you literally can get people saying ‘Take my money!’ – it’s actually happened to me once.

And, I can show you how to get the same eager, happy-to-buy, I’m-enrolling-myself kind of response in buyers that I get.

Want that for yourself?

Let me know, I’ll show you how.

Cheers,

Martin

Why You Need Permission in Sales, and How to Get it

Selling without permission is coercion.

You can’t morally or ethically have a sales conversation with someone who hasn’t given you permission for that type of conversation.

And, selling without permission is ridiculously ineffective.

You’ll have heard people talking about ‘handling objections’ – but, isn’t it better to not have any buyer objections at all?

Then seek to gain permission first, before ever talking about your offer.

It’s the difference between talking to a person who says ‘yes but’, and someone who says ‘Tell me more’.

And that ‘tell me more’ is what you get when you gain deeper levels of permission, ongoingly.

Level 1: permission to ask questions. You get that level when someone agrees to meet with you. Not that difficult.

Level 2: permission to ask deeper questions, to find the problems behind the problems, and the causes behind the causes (google ‘the 5 whys’ for more on that kind of inquiry – it’s pretty useful).

Level 3: permission to discuss how you might be able to help. This isn’t where you’re selling, it’s where the two of you are exploring if you’re a good fit, mutually.

Level 4: permission to ask for the sale. Asking for the sale is often the most daunting of the entire sales process, but it won’t be if you first took care of gaining the first 3 levels.

When you do, asking for a sale will be as easy and natural as saying to a friend ‘So shall we catch that movie tonight?’.

It’s not for nothing that Seth Godin coined the term ‘permission marketing’.

Well, there’s permission selling, as well.

So how do you gain permission from your buyer?

Ask questions.

We say too much. Recommend too much. Expound and reason and explain and… well, we waffle a lot, don’t we?

Especially when we’re uncomfortable with the sales process, which is largely due to not having paid enough attention to what level of permission we have from a buyer at any given time.

Instead of talking, listen more.

Ask questions.

Questions are the currency that buys you permission.

Cheers,

Martin

P.s. I’m looking for a few people whose business exists to make a difference in the world, to work with me 1 on 1 this winter.
I’ll coach you on how to make a bigger impact (and a bigger splash, financially :) than you thought possible, by showing you how easy sales becomes when you let your values and integrity lead the process.
Let me know if you’re interested…

How High-Integrity Entrepreneurs Make Followup Easy

What do you do when it looks like a sale is going to close… and then it doesn’t?

Everything looks good, the other person is on board… and then something goes wrong, and the buyer doesn’t buy.

In my work I see over and over again, how people rich in integrity and ethics stop there.

And I get it – it used to be the same for me.

When an opportunity broke down, I just moved on.

And if you do that too, you’re leaving money on the table. As they say: the fortune is in the followup.

And sure, then you get the gurus telling you that you must follow up because it’s your moral and ethical duty to make sure that the right buyer gets his stuff from you, and not someone else, and – well, fat lot of good that does.

Knowing that doesn’t make it any easier to do it – especially if you’re a person who sticks to their values, you treat people with respect, and you don’t want to be a nuisance.

So then, how do ethical people do sales and follow up? What made the difference for me, and could it work for you as well?

Maybe. Most probably: yes.

It’s really simple, too:

Make every interaction a moment of joy. Have fun talking to your customers, serve them, be yourself and be light.

You’re not there to be all dry and professional – or indeed, salesy – because who wants to talk to someone like that?

Instead, make the interaction about connecting, and learning that person, and figuring out what’s real and/or trying for them.

When you do that, you leave people feeling ‘Yeah, I feel respected by you. I’ll talk to you again’.

Do you see where I’m going?

When you have conversations people enjoy, they’ll be open to hear from you again.

Once I got this, following up with folk became as natural to me as writing these daily articles.

But it’s not just about how you follow up – it’s about how you do everything everything in your business.

Do those things – including having sales conversations – in a way that makes people love dealing with you.

You know, like friends do.

That way, you’ll never have to fret about following up again.

Bye friend. Talk again soon :)

Martin

Oh, and: if you haven’t yet, make sure you watch this training, where I show you how the above works… and after that, feel free to get in touch to talk about working together and implementing this type of selling in your business.

Success Is Not the Solution

Last year at a round table discussion in Malaga, one of the guests was a lady preparing to open a lingerie shop for plus size women.

In itself, an idea that definitely has legs.

But for her as a bootstrapper with a limited budget, I had serious doubts about the nature of her plans.

She wanted to rent a storefront in Malaga’s most famous shopping street, launch with a bang, and  with that she hoped she would be on the road.

Which might work, sure.

But to *make* it works means a lot of moving pieces have to be in the right place. Brand choice, marketing, provider deals, targeting, pricing, promotion… it’s a lot.

And if you’re bootstrapping and you bet all you have on getting all the ducks in a row, just right, just so… and something’s off?

Then you’re back where you started, minus the savings yo invested. Oops.

Again, it’s not that it can’t happen, but is it the right approach?

Doesn’t it make more sense to test first?

Get feedback from the market, test your marketing, see if people buy?

And then when it’s not only your own plans and strategies that say it’ll work, but the market confirms, voting with their money?

That’s when you know how to put all the moving pieces in place, and that’s when it makes sense to build bigger and launch with a bang.

For example, this lady could have had her shop up and running in one or two weeks, by partnering with a business that serves a similar audience, and offering her products indoors of her partner’s premises.

Low-cost, low risk, direct customer feedback. What’s not to like?

But nope, she didn’t like that.

She wanted a shop, by golly, and she wanted to open properly.

Can’t blame her, but the thing that still worries me is that she was *in love with the idea of being a successful shop owner*, when it’s much more effective to be *in love with developing strategies, systems and actions that create your success*.

The former keeps you looking at the goal and how pretty it is, and while you’re doing that you’re not looking at the latter, which is the thing that’s meant to get you to that pretty goal.

Here’s the mistake people make:

The envision success, and think that reaching success will be the solution to everything.

Where success can be whatever you want: wealth, a successful shop, a million dollars a year, buying your own home, going nomad… whatever you want.

“Once I have XYZ, then all my problems and struggles will be over. Solved!”

In reality though, success is not the solution.

Success is the consequence of the solution – i.e. strategies, systems, and actions. Those solve for the obstacles preventing you from achieving success.

Success is never the solution – it’s the consequence of it.

And if you’re the kind of person who gets this, and who makes sure that development gets time and attention, and you want to get more leverage and ROI on your efforts, maybe we ought to talk.

I only work with a handful of clients at a time, and I’m looking to connect with the kind of person who is driven, is guided by purpose, is able to look in the mirror, and has a bias to taking action.

If that’s you, let me know…

Cheers,

Martin

Ten Rules of Ethical Selling: #1 – Diagnose Before Prescription

If a doctor would prescribe medication or treatment without doing a proper diagnose, it’s called malpractice. It’s the stuff that hurts patients and get doctors sued, and rightly so.

It’s not just legal obligation and best practice: it’s the right thing to do.

As a business owner, our responsibility is not very different.

Yet each day, I see people with a great product or service, real good eggs trying to make a difference, and they ruin everything because they come charging in brandishing their thing, saying things to the effect of ‘You really need this!’.

And sure, maybe the other person really does need your thing – but how would you know?

If you don’t properly ‘diagnose’ the buyer’s situation, needs, and urgency first, how can you know whether they need you thing or not – how can you prescribe before you diagnose?

If you solve problems for a client, the way a doctor treats illness, do you not solve problems better, and more often, if you first figure out whether or not people actually, really, need your thing?

Now, this goes beyond good practice and doing right by people:

It’s also an excellent attitude to take when selling.

Because when you ask enough questions so that you’re able to accurately diagnose a problem someone has, you’ll gain a deep insight into the problem, its causes, and possible solutions.

And if you then state the problem better than the person you’re talking to could state it, they’ll automatically become interested in your solution.

And if that solution then is right for them, at this moment, they’ll enroll themselves – no selling required.

When you hear me say ‘I help people fall in love with selling’, that’s really what it comes down to:

A shift in perspective and attitude, that transforms ‘selling’ into enrollment, or: moving forward with people.

It’s fun and I can teach you – just holler.

On that note: I know that many people who might want to get in touch with me, don’t do so because they’re concerned about the cost.

And if that’s you, worry ye not: getting in touch has no cost, nor does an initial friendly chat – and as for coaching programmes:

I’m always happy to work out a coaching programme that works if you’re on a budget but you do want help and you want it now.

If that’s you, say ‘yay’ and let’s see what we can do…

Cheers,

Martin

Menu Title