Whose Job is it Anyway?

I park my bike and walk up to the cash machine.

At the door of the bank, two Spanish men: a son my age, and an ageing father.

“Dad, you don’t need to go in here every day.

“I can access your account from my computer, no problem.

“Really, there’s no need. If you want, I can print out a bank statement each day for you”.

The father stands there, quiet. It’s not clear if he understands what his son is telling him.

So far, it’s sounded friendly enough – but suddenly, the son says “Or do whatever the hell you want to” and storms off. (what he actually said in Spanish sounds a lot harsher).

As I withdraw my cash, I wonder:

Is the father losing his marbles a bit, unable to understand?

Is he untrusting of online banking?

Or of his son?

Has modern life overtaken his level of comfort with processes and procedures, and he just really wants a face at a bank telling him his account status?

There’s no telling, but one thing is certain:

He wasn’t buying his son’s ‘there’s no need’.

Also certain: It’s not the father’s job to understand, or to trust, or to accept.

Instead, it’s the son’s job to find the message that will finally convince his father that showing up live at the bank daily really isn’t necessary.

But, he got frustrated and his temper flared up.

If ever you get frustrated when someone doesn’t buy your work, or buy in to the good idea you’re trying to to get across, remember this:

It’s not the other person’s job to do so.

Instead, it’s your job to reach that other, and you do that by putting yourself in their shoes.

It’s in *their* world that the sale happens.

So if they’re not buying, it’s your job to keep the conversation open, and asking questions will get you much further than pushing your agenda, no matter how valid your agenda may be.

Cheers,

Martin

Truth, Evolution, and Sales

“Oh hang on, I need to take this call”.

A friendly chat with the groundskeeper of a place I used to live. He pulls out his phone, listens, and says:

“Sorry, I can’t meet today – I’m not at home, I had to go to town for an errand”.

I look around me at the meadows, his horses, and his home just behind him.

Hm. a liar.

Ah but, it’s a little white lie, isn’t it?

Perhaps, but from that moment on, the trust I used to have for him broke, and never got restored. Not in a big ‘he’s unreliable, avoid at all cost’ way, but enough to make me wary about what he said and did.

Always a feeling of ‘is it true?’

The other day, talking about the way politicians these days think nothing of pathological lying, someone said: “But isn’t truthfulness something installed by Christianity, meaning it’s only a social construct?”

Well, no. Truthfulness is an evolutionary imperative, no matter how ‘cleverly’ followers of corrupt politicians try to justify lying.

Humanity NEEDS trust. It couldn’t have survived without it.

Imagine: thousands of years ago, I put on my bearskin and step out of my cave.

A fine day for gathering berries.

I grab my club and set off, and on my way to the valley, I run into another caveman.

“Seen any lions in the valley, last few days?”, I ask.

“Nah, says the caveman. It’s been quiet for days, you’re safe”.

Imagine if at the end of the day I’d come home with scratch marks and bites, because there WERE lions, and I barely made it out alive…

Don’t you think the first thing I’d do is crack my neighbour’s skull with my club… someone who thinks nothing of sending me into a pack of lions?

Of course! It’s survival, baby. Evolution doesn’t care about values, religious or otherwise.

Evolution cares about just one thing: Survive.

And whether it’s on the level of threats in the wilderness or telling white lies, you better believe that other people have a radar for truthfulness and reliability.

Which is damn important if you want to land clients, because the moment there’s even the slightest lack of trust, there’s no sale.

How to use this principle in order to get more sales?

Simple:

Speak nothing but full truth.

You’ll be amazed what it does for the level of trust your prospects have in you.

Cheers,

Martin

Men and Women Wanted for Perilous Journey

Extreme commitment required, long periods of doubt and second-guessing, constant risk.

Success as likely as failure.

Wealth and recognition in case of success.

Reply to learn more.

Cheers,

​Martin

Wading Through a Sea of NO

Yesterday on the webinar, someone said in the comments that they’d like to become like a magnet, i.e. have inbound sales, instead of having to go out and find buyers.

And yeah, it’s something we all want:

Buyers show up, money in hand, ready to buy your work.

But while it’s possible to achieve, the path to getting there is long, hard and filled with disappointments.

There simply is no way around it, no matter what ‘miracle solution’ the sleazy marketing types try to sell you.

See, someone like Tony Robbins or Oprah, sure they have inbound requests.

But that’s only because they’re super famous.

And to become famous, they had to ‘comer calle’, as they say in Spain: Eat streets.

In other words: hit the pavement. Get out there, show up, wade yourself through a sea of ‘no’ until you get to a ‘yes’.

Oprah didn’t just show up successful – she *made* herself successful, and it took a long time.

Stephen King is another example: no matter what he writes, his fans will buy the books.

Film makers seek him out to get the rights to his work.

But good ole’ Stephen had to wade through his own sea of ‘no’.

In fact, he received so many rejection letters from publishers, that he had to replace the nail he’d stick them on, with a longer one.

Here’s the lesson:

To become successful, or famous even, or to get inbound sales working for you, don’t focus on that as a goal.

Instead, focus on the activities in your control, that will ultimately get you there.

So the question is: what activities can you implement, that are doable enough, and fun enough, for you to carry on doing them, no matter how many no’s you have to run into?

Cheers,

Martin

Selling From the Heart…?

The sleazy salesperson squeezes people, bullies them into handing over money, and it’s usually based on greed.

The everyday seller tries to sell based on need.

The ethical person enrols a buyer by staying true to values such as integrity and truthfulness.

And the lover of life, the spiritually inclined, the person who lives by ‘other before self’?

That person sells from the Heart.

If you’re in the first group, I can’t help you.

If you’re in the second, I can show you how to sell more exactly by not being needy.

And if you’re in the 3rd or 4th group?

Then I can show you how to fall in love with selling, and to sell from the Heart.

And you can learn that, plus a whole lot more, today at 11.30 Eastern, 17.30 CEST.

This will be a live training with Q&A, and you’ll experience a massive upgrade to your sales skills.

Click the link to register, and see you on the training webinar!

Register to attend here –> http://martinstellar.com/leap-ethical-selling-system/

See you later today!

Cheers,

Martin

Perspective in Sales: Yours vs Theirs

It would seem to make sense, that in order for someone to enroll in what you propose (be it buying, or buying in to a non-business related vision you have), you need to find out how to get that person to see what you see.

You have a vision for their ideal outcome, right? You know that if they go along with your proposal, they’ll benefit. You see it clear as day.

So, the job at hand becomes ‘how to convey my vision’.

But as you’ll have experienced – in life as well as in business – that’s hard to do.

People have their objections, their fears, their reasons why and why not… and if only they would SEE… right?

Well, the good news is that you can safely stop trying to sell people on your vision.

It’s much easier, and much more effective, to step into *their* vision.

Because a sale happens in the world of the other person, not yours.

It’s the vision that they have, that determines whether or not they’ll buy into your proposal.

Because once you see their side of things, you’ll be able to ask the questions they need to hear, in order to get clarity, remove doubts, and dissolve fears.

That way, their vision adjusts, so that it ends up matching yours. And that’s when the sale happens.

How to do that?

Simple: use empathy. And not the kind where you empathise with their problems, and give them a shoulder to cry on.

I’m talking about the empathy that enables you to see their world, through their eyes.

Put differently: it’s perspective-taking.

It’s not their job to take your perspective – instead, it’s your job to take their perspective.

Put yourself in the other person’s shoes, and your sales will be much much easier.

And when you watch my training this Thursday, even more so.

Registration here: http://martinstellar.com/leap-ethical-selling-system/

Cheers,

Martin

Quality | Vision | Decision

You as a provider of quality good or services, you know that when someone buys from you, it’s good for them.

Otherwise, an ethical person wouldn’t be in business. People like us aren’t here to pull one over on buyers.

But for someone to trust you so much that they’ll buy from you, they need to know that, on a visceral level.

And for that to happen, they need to have a vision of what your product or service will do for them.

The mistake most sellers make, is to focus on their own, personal vision of that buyer experiencing the benefits of a purchase.

But, as I’ll never stop saying: in a sales conversation (or indeed: in business) it’s not about you.

It’s about the buyer, their fears and frustrations, their wants and aspirations.

And, it’s about *their* vision, not yours.

As long as your sales conversation centres around how well you think the purchase will benefit them, you’ll have a hard time creating buyers.

So instead, focus on *their* vision.

Make the conversation about them. Use your empathy to step into their world, because a sale happens not in your world, but in theirs.

And in that world, you will see their vision, which includes concerns, fears and objections.

And once you’re in their world, you’ll be able to see their vision – and as the conversation progresses, they’ll be able to buy into your vision.

That’s how you create buyers, in a way that’s 0% pushy or manipulative, and 100% fun.

It’s taken me 25 years to figure out how to do that most effectively.

And it bothers me to no end, when I see good, honest business owners, who deliver quality, but they don’t manage to create enough clients, or they keep having to sell at prices that are too low.

That’s why I created the LEAP sales system, and it’s why you’ll be able to learn the fundamentals of it this Thursday, in my training webinar (which comes with a Q&A)

Here’s where you can register: http://martinstellar.com/leap-ethical-selling-system/

You can skip it, or you can attend and experience a big shift in how you sell your work… choice is yours…

Cheers,

Martin

Values –> Alignment –> Resonance –> Sale

Whenever someone buys something, there’s something that resonates with them.

Somewhere in the mix of desired outcomes, emotions, trust and thought, there’s a ‘vibe’ that goes ‘yeah. want’.

If ever you came out of a conversation with a buyer and they didn’t buy, it means that there was element of resonance missing.

So how do you create resonance?

That’s a long and complex answer – which you’ll hear in next week’s training webinar – but one very simple way to improve the level of resonance, is to start with one of the deepest psychological elements:

Values.

You have things that are values for you, things that come before anything else, should not be violated. Principles you live by.

And, so does your buyer.

Usually when talking to people, you’ll discover whether or not you have values and principles in common.

If you don’t you’re out of alignment with that person – which isn’t a disaster, but it does make it more likely that you won’t reach enough resonance for them to buy.

The solution?

Put yourself in front of people who have similar or same values as you do.

That way, the moment you start talking, you’re aligned on a psychologically important level. Usually not even consciously.

But as you converse, you’ll both discover that you have more and more values and principles in common.

Each time they discover that, they feel more aligned with you.

And that makes it SO much easier to create a client, compared to trying to enroll someone whose values are far off from yours.

Making sure your buyer-conversations are with people who are aligned with you is one of the quickest and most powerful ways to increase your conversion rate.

Did that click for you?

Then don’t miss the free webinar – you’ll see a lot more things click, where it comes to sales.

Here’s where you register…

Cheers,

Martin

Are You Frightening the Natives?

Everybody wants to be well, and nobody wants to be in pain.

And since some kinds of pain (or danger, a different form of pain) can be fatal, and wellbeing makes for thriving individuals and societies, evolution has built in a simple, very effective mechanism, right at the very core of our psyche.

A sort of bodyguard, always looking out for us. Always trying to drive us towards pleasure and wellbeing, and away from pain, risk, threat, and danger.

And we all know that in order to get results with people, we need to be careful to not scare or threaten them.

If you meet a shy child, you speak softly, calmly. Maybe get down on one knee, to not be overbearing.

If you see a guy or gal you like and you’d like to speak, you approach them gently, attentively, so as to not appear threatening.

If you’re in the wilderness and you meet a tribe that’s not used to people from the modern world, you’d be doubly careful. Wouldn’t want to go home with a spear sticking out of you etc.

Even with animals, you make sure your behaviour doesn’t threaten them.

All living things – and that includes buyers – have a radar for threats.

But when it comes to sales conversations, we often, inadvertently, appear threatening in some way.

Not because we are – we’re good people, who sell something truly useful, and we don’t mean harm nor do we want to be pushy – but it’s never about us.

A buyer has a slew of thoughts, wishes, frustrations, doubts, and yes: fears.

And if we’re not careful, it’s super easy to not notice, and appear threatening.

Scaring the natives – when really, all we want to do is help!

The trick is to feel into them. Care about them and their decision and results – use empathy and place yourself in their shoes.

See the world that they live in, and you’ll know what kind of things they need to hear, or ask, or feel, in order to not feel threatened, doubtful, or untrusting.

The money that you earn as a reward for your product or service, sure. That’s about you.

But the conversation that makes people want to give it, that’s about them.

And the more you make that clear, the safer and trusting they’ll feel.

Selling your work? It’s about them. Always, 100%.

Want to learn the deeper workings of this kind of ethical selling?

Then join my live training webinar, Thursday next week.

Registration here. (Yes, I decided to use the Zoom platform instead of Gotowebinar – I’ve you already signed up to the latter, you’ll receive an email confirming the change)

Cheers,

Martin

Are You Selling Them a Problem?

Did a coaching session a while back, which gave me a super useful insight you might find handy.

I was asked: “Martin, I have the hardest time recruiting people for these franchise opportunities. What do you suggest?”

I had him explain his process to me, and when he was done, I told him:

“Stop trying to sell people a problem”.

Obviously he was confused, because what he’s selling is actually a great opportunity.

But for whom?

Because to start a franchise, even if the cost to entry is $0, means that you’re taking on a huge, enormous, all-consuming ‘problem’.

You know this, since you’re an entrepreneur. Building and growing and running a venture is HARD work and will be so for many years.

To 99.99% of the population, that’s a ‘hell no!’ kind of problem.

It’s only for the daring, the crazy, the true heart&soul entrepreneurs.

Starting a business, of any kind, takes a very special kind of person.

The kind of person who LOVES working ongoingly, on solving big hairy complex ‘problems’. Or challenges, if you want a more constructive framework.

An entrepreneur is someone who doesn’t just accept the ‘problem’ of being in business – people like us, whether consciously or not, we love problems.

Getting our hands dirty, extracting every ounce of creative problem-solving we have in us.

So for this franchiser, his solution is simple: go present the option to just that kind of person. Skip talking to anyone who is the employee-type, and not the entrepreneur type.

But what about you?

I’ll assume your work is excellent, worth the money, and yet… why are not more people buying your thing?

Could it be that, in the buyer’s perception, buying your stuff somehow represents or causes a problem?

Think about it: what, in your offer and your marketing, could be problematic for the buyer, in some way?

Are you, somehow, ‘selling them a problem?’

Sure, ‘finding the money’ or ‘am I willing to part with that cash?’ can be a possible problem for them, but beyond that:

In what other ways might you, unwittingly, be selling a problem?

Here’s a simple, quick fix, if you feel this might be why you’re not getting more sales:

Keep your offer simple.

You wouldn’t believe how many sales fall through simply because the package (or it’s presentation) is too complex and too overwhelming.

And when there’s overwhelm, there’s confusion, insufficient confidence, and lack of trust.

Simplify, and you remove those barriers to entry in the mind of the buyer.

Want more of this, and the whole LEAP Sales System spelled out in detail?

Then register ye here for a training webinar: http://martinstellar.com/leap-ethical-selling-system/

Note in case you’ve already registered: I’ve moved the date forward, to: Thursday 18 April, at 17:30 CEST, 12:30 Eastern.

See you then,

Martin

 

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