“That’ll Be 75 ‘Likes’, Please” – Said Nobody, Ever

It’s nice to be popular, but when the barista rings up your order and you tell him “I’ve got 100.000 followers on Instagram!” he might be impressed, but his reply will still be “2.95, please”.

Likes, followers, social sharing: it’s nice, it can be useful too, but in the end, playground popularity doesn’t pay the bills.

I’ve written about it before, but David Newman in his book ‘Do it! Speaking’ put a fine point on it (I’m reading the book because this year I want to get serious about public speaking).

Says he: “An audience values an experience. A market values expertise”

And: “An audience wants your autograph. A market wants to give you their signature”.

(Interestingly, very recently I experienced the difference firsthand: I went to a lecture on a topic I’m interested in, but the speaker didn’t really do it for me, and the content of the lecture was too superficial for my taste. So, I’d never buy the speaker’s book, or hire them for a talk… in that room, I was part of the audience, not part of the market).

And sure, of course your market lives inside, is part of, your audience.

But if you focus your business and marketing activities on growing your audience instead of finding the right market and the right way to appeal to them, you’ll be spinning your wheels.

So if you look at your business operations, and the projects you’re working on, and your plans for the year:

Are you looking to build your audience, or your market…?

Also: do you want help, building your market?

Cheers,

Martin

How to Make It Much More Likely You’ll Actually Get the Job Done

A quiet Sunday, and I’m having coffee at the beach with friends.

“I don’t get it”, she says. “I keep telling myself that this weekend, I’ll get stuck in and do this or that big job I have. And I always end up procrastinating on it and doing something else. But I resolved to do it, with all the intent I have – so why don’t I do it?”

There’s a university full of psychologists who could make a fortune answering that question, but in the end, the why isn’t relevant.

More relevant and more useful is asking ‘in what way do I need to show up, execute, or perform, so that the job can get done?’

Consider:

If you say “I’ll get it done this weekend” means you saddle yourself with an amount of work, time-spend and exertion, that you can’t completely measure or schedule for. Too many moving parts, no telling how much energy you’ll have or how much you’ll actually need…

So the moment you show up to do the job, your subconscious gets overwhelmed and poof goes your motivation, and hello Netflix.

If you want to get a job done, don’t impose a ‘done’ on yourself.

Instead, decide to spend time working on it, with the specific attitude and type of focus required to do that job.

Process instead of outcome – and the attitude you’ll need to bring in order to perform the process best as can.

This weekend, I wanted to knock my projects & tasks back into shape. And so I didn’t say “I’ll sort Todoist out”, but instead my intent was:

“I’m going to spend time like a strategist, and give my most top-level mindwork to planning out my weeks and months, and making sure all my projects are sorted properly” – and yep, that worked.

‘Complete a project’ isn’t a very good goal. It’s an outcome that results from a goal that describes your way of operating… so when you want to get stuff done, choose not the goals, but the version of you (and the behaviour that version brings) that can make the goals real.

Cheers,

Martin

Much, Much Better Than New Year’s Resolutions

Now that the holidays are over and all the talk about the new year and resolutions has died down, let’s talk about something that actually works for creating change and growth:
Implementation intention.

Because if you’ve ever had another slice of pie, whilst telling yourself that come January, you’ll be on a diet, you’ve probably noticed that resolutions don’t work. I mean: no gym is as full in use in January, as the number of people who sign up for membership in December. QED etc.

The problem with resolutions is that they go against the way our brain works.

When you eat now and decide to diet later, you’re giving your future self a problem. Today hedonism, tomorrow diet…? Hell no. And thus, making the resolution is in itself a way to ensure you won’t keep it. You can try to enforce today’s decision on the person you are tomorrow, but the moment you do that, your subconscious rebels.

Implementation intention though is different. And it’s simple, elegant, and effective.

And to put it to use, simply take some time in the morning, and reflect on what you want to do today, what might get in the way, and what you’ll do if that happens.

In other words: you visualise the best-case scenario, and then the worst-case scenario, and then you build solutions into your plan, for when things go wrong.

And the simplest way is to use the IF / THEN format that pogrammers use.

In other words: simple process-rules.

IF: it’s a new day
THEN: take some time to reflect and plan, before jumping into work

IF: planning is done
THEN: close FB, IG, mail, airplane phone & set a timer for 20 or 40 or 60 minutes ofuninterrupted execution

IF: I’m feeling tired and tempted to go onto Facebook
THEN: close laptop and go for a walk/call a friend/do a few pushups/make some tea

IF: listed tasks are done
THEN: review calendar and todo-lists – and then take a break

See how simple and powerful it can be, to pre-define triggers, the actions that they cause, and solutions for when things break down?

Now obviously, planning your implementation intention doesn’t mean you’ll automatically get everything done. Sure you wrote the ‘programme’, but you’re not a computer, and you won’t always follow your own rules.

But once you have them, and you know what the rules are, you have a course, a compass, by which you can measure your performance.

And if you find that you deviated or slacked off, you can go back to your rules and re-commit, or revise them.

IF: didn’t stick with the plan
THEN: stop executing, sit down, review & improve plan

Right?

So here’s where implementation intention differs from resolutions.

A resolution is a decision you make once, and then it’s meant to keep you on track ongoingly, based off that single decision.

But for any change to happen, any order or discipline or progress to be made, decisions need to be made again, and again, and again.

You don’t ‘go on a diet’ – you decide each day, and with each delectable morsel that shows up in your day, to stick with the diet. Decision, decision, decision, over and over again.

You decide – with intentionality – on what you’ll implement and how, and you keep deciding over and over.

So, now that you’ve seen your resolutions dissolve like a whisp of smoke the way they always do… implementation intention is what will actually get the results.

Good luck, and let me know if you need any help.

Cheers,

Martin

Making Time for Our Most Important Roles

I often talk about ‘the suits we wear’ – the different roles we play depending on the context we’re in, or the task that’s at hand.

One of the fastest and easiest ways to create a sense of purpose, achievement and well-being – and to actually make results happen – is to get very conscious of these roles, and get very deliberate and intentional with them.

Because there’s a ton of them that we use – suits we wear – throughout our days: the seller, the writer, the listener, the bookkeeper, the courier, the self-carer, the student…

This can be either massively helpful, or dreadfully destructive, and the difference lies in intentionality.

Because most of the time, we jump from one role to the next as the situation seems to demand – like we’re multitasking our way through different ways of operating and showing up.

And that switching from one role to the next, that’s very costly in terms of our mental and emotional energy.

And, it slows us down because with each switch, we need to adjust and settle in, which can easily take 20 or 30 minutes.

Switch three of four times in a day, and and you lose an hour or more of your day – and most of us are switching all the time… no wonder we feel so drained and ineffective at the end of a day!

So to get the most out of all you got, consider the three main roles, and plan time for each:

There’s the Maker, who executes on tasks, gets jobs done, checks things off. That’s the creative, productive role, the one that produces output and tangible assets.

There’s the Strategist, who analyses the status quo, assesses the playing field, and who creates and schedules plans, develops hypotheses and tests in order to improve operations.

And, very importantly, the Strategist lays out the work for the Maker, who loves that because the Maker doesn’t want to think, plan, or decide – the Maker just wants to know what nail needs hitting next, so that he can get on with it
and get jobs done.

And then there’s the third main role, which I’ll call The Performer, though that’s not an ideal label.

But the Performer is the one who shows up, delivers a talk or a pitch, who publishes videos and articles, who writes books and teaches and coaches and trains:

It’s the public-facing side of your brand and business.

Each of these core three roles need attention, and space blocked out in your calendar.

Because these roles are essential for building and growing a business – for anything in life that you want to achieve, really.

I mean, you’ll never catch that flight unless you spend at least some time, and yesterday’s dishes tend to not get done unless we call in the Maker.

That’s why I like to see these roles as distinct identities I can step into, and I make sure I plan time for each of them.

And if ever you find yourself struggling, or annoyed that things aren’t working, ask yourself:

Is my Strategist getting enough time, and doing a good job?

Is my Maker supplied with outlined workplans, and given time to make things?

Is my Performer (or Artist, or Teacher, or Coach, or whatever is your ‘show-up’ archetype) getting out there enough, and am I creating enough time for him/her?

You’ll notice that each question includes ‘time’, and you’ll likely find that one or more aren’t getting dedicated, intentinally planned time, but instead are being given the scraps of the calendar.

Switch that up, block out time for that role, and watch what changes.

Should bring interesting results, so let me know if you anything cool happens…

Cheers,

Martin

Business Growth, Made Simple

Ever notice how easy it is to complicate things?

We decide to grow our business, choose an approach and a plan, and before we know it there’s endless todo-lists, multiple areas of attention, several projects simultaneously under development, and a feeling of overwhelm that creeps up on us like thunderclouds on the horizon.

When in reality, growing a business can be very simple, even if that doesn’t mean it’s easy.

That said, the simpler things are, the easier to handle they are.

So if you want to grow your business in 2020, here’s a simple (heh) rule of thumb to guide you:

Create incremental growth in three core areas:

1: More potential clients

Plenty of options to make that happen: Social media posting, speaking gigs, workshops in your area, host webinars, organise an online summit, run FB ads… whatever is easiest (sic) for you in order to increase visibility

2: Higher conversion rates

Lots of people don’t pay attention here, and that’s costly because every potential customer who finds you or contacts you, has incurred a cost in your business – either in terms of time or money. The more people you can enroll, the more efficient your business becomes.

So ask yourself: what can I change in my branding, my site, my activities, my communications, so that more people sign on? (Hint: getting better at enrolling helps here, and my LEAP Ethical Sales Training makes you lots better).

3: Increase value per customer

I’m not saying you should supersize your customers, and unless you’re MacDonald’s I doubt your customers ‘want fries with that’.

But, there’s a good chance that a buyer will want an add-on when they buy from you, or perhaps after working with you, there’s another programme or course that would help them.

Except many business owners wrap up client projects and move on to finding more buyers, which that means you’re leaving money on the table – and it means that you might be underserving your buyers.

Sure, you’re not going to foist an upsell on anyone… but what if you can provide or do something that would delight a current customer, after their first stint with you?

Well, if you don’t offer it, nothing will happen. But if you do offer it, what might happen is that they buy, which brings the total lifetime value of that customer up.

So here’s some questions for you:

Do you think you could generate 10% more potential clients, next year? Can’t be too hard, can it? Only 10%….

And, could you raise your conversion rates by 10%? Probably yes, right?

And then, what if across the board you could raise the average customer lifetime value by 10%… could that be done? Very likely, yes. Again, 10% isn’t that much.

But if you apply the 10% growth across all three areas, you end up with a total of 33% growth for your business, and that’s nothing to sneeze at.

AND it’s something that most businesses can attain, AND it’s a super simple, testable strategy: 10% across three areas… what could be simpler?

So if you want to grow in 2020, do it the smart, simple way. Increase prospects, increase conversion rates, increase customer LTV, go for 10% in each area.

Simple, manageable, and a nice way to stay clear of overwhelm.

Want to chat and work out a few (simple!) ideas to help you grow 10% in each area?

Let me know…

Cheers,

Martin

10 Principles for a Fun and Profitable Business

Some of these took me a long while to accept, others to discover, and some to implement.

All of it is, I guess, a work in progress – like the self, our business, and life in general.

So here’s what I learned over the years, in no particular order, to help make your business easier, more fun, and more profitable.

1: Learn how to write copy. Business will always require writing, and the sooner you get a grip on how to write tightly, in a way that’s clear and compelling, the better you’ll do. It’s an unmissable skill in business.

2: Learn how to enroll people. You can call it selling or persuasion or whatever you want, but if you have a business, you deal with people and you want people to align with your vision, right? Whether we want buyers, high-performing teams, active and responsive followers… you want to really *get* psychology in such a way that you’re able to *move people*. Because that’s what enrolling and selling are ultimately about.

3: Always stay active in growing your list. It’s the core asset of your business and you should never stop growing it.

4: Speaking of assets: your business is full of them, except we tend to overlook or discount them, especially when they aren’t tangible. A fleet of cars is an asset, but so it a list of past customers, who might buy again or introduce you to someone. More assets: your reputation, your network, the quality of your work… all assets that can be leveraged, and your life and business are full of them. Get of your assets, put them to use for your business.

5: Never get good at the small stuff. Sure it’s great if you know how to fix the printer or design a logo – but if your money-making activity is, say, doing SEO at $100 an hour, you spending an hour fixing the printer cost you a hundred bucks. Better pay someone 25 and use your time to do work that pays.

6: Protect the owner (that would be you, operating as a business owner, instead of a business operator). Most of the time, we work *in* our business, and forget to work *on* our business. This is a massively bad idea because it keeps us stuck in the hamsterwheel of doing and making, stealing time from architecting, strategising, and planning, which is what make for business growth.

7: Values and shared values are the core of finding product-market fit – and enrolling buyers. Not everyone who shares your values will be a good client for you, but if you look at your best, most lucrative and most fun clients, you’ll likely find that those people had a lot in common with you, in terms of values. Find more of those people.

8: Keep it simple. And that’s how simple I’ll keep this point :)

9: Systemise everything. Systems aren’t boring: they are what free up your mind for creative thinking, problem-solving, and creating content that attracts people or that people will pay for. After all, these days we’re all a publishing company, whether we publish work for marketing or for getting paid.

10: Talk to your people. Video, email marketing, public talks or social media: it doesn’t matter where you do it, but you’ve got to show up. Nothing will show up (clients, opportunities, partners, etc) unless you do.

There’s a lot more that goes into a business that’s fun and profitable of course, but if you look at this list, you’ll see there’s a nice set of do’s, don’t’s, skills and attitudes in there, enough to keep you on the right track.

And, if you want a goalsetting strategy session to get started right in the new year, let me know. I’m currently offering 50-minute sessions for $50 – something I’ve never done before. Let me know if you’re up for some serious work on setting goals that will work for you.

Cheers,

Martin

What You Wanted, and Did You Get It?

You know I’m not the kind of guy to jump on bandwagons, but in all the talk about goalsetting, and reviewing the year and the decade, and gearing up for a new one, there’s something missing – and it’s possible the single most important notion for you to install, if you want to *actually get* what you *actually want to get*.

And I chose those words with care, in that order, because:

What you think you want, isn’t usually the same as what you really want. Meaning, on a subconscious level.

“What is it that you really want” is a fantastic question to ask (yourself or others), but it’s the reason why you want that, where things start getting interesting.

And then the reason why you want that, and the reason behind that…

It’s similar to the ‘5 why’s’ principle, except you ask 5 times: “What about that makes me want it?’.

You’ll quickly come to an insight as to the deeper reason, and that will serve you set the right goals.

Because the goalsetting secret nobody seems to talk about is that our mind may well set goals and make plans, but it’s our subconscious that mostly drives where we’ll end up.

It’s what your subconscious wants that’s dominant in how you think, decide, and operate, so you’d better *know* what your subconscious wants.

That way, you can set goals that are aligned both with your mind, and your gut&instinct. And those goals are the kinds you’ll achieve – whereas if there is no alignment, things probably will be a struggle, or won’t work, or you’ll be stressed and overwhelmed or things will end up a mess…

Been there, have you? Yeah, me too.

What you want to achieve in 2020 is one thing. What your subconscious wants to achieve is probably, somehow, different.

Figure out what it is, and overlay the two. Happy 2020 etc etc.

And if you didn’t reach your goals, it’s good to do some thinking and figure out in what way your subconscious wanted something other than what you rationally told yourself you wanted, because likely there was something off there.

Meanwhile, I’ve just had an idea:

What if I give you a single, one-off session, specifically intended to help you set the best possible goals for the year?

I don’t usually do this, because clients work with me in coaching programmes, and not one-off sessions…

But hey it’s Christmas, so why not make an exception and help you get started right in the new year?

We’ll take 50 minutes on Zoom, put an X-ray on your aspirations and challenges, and create a set of goals that are as perfectly aligned as possible.

And unlike my normal fees, which are much higher, this session will be only $50. I’ve no idea how many people will sign up for this, so this offer can disappear at any time.

Want goals that are actually attainable, plus advice on how to reach them?

Let me know…

Cheers,

Martin

Assumptions Blind, but Hypotheses Guide: Treat Everything Like a Test or Experiment

Assumptions blind, but hypotheses guide: treat everything like a test or experiment

It’s impossible to not make assumptions. We all do it, all the time, and we should thank our subconsciousness for feeding us assumptions – after all, it’s what has kept humanity alive for a long long time.

But, it’s a mistake – and often a very serious mistake – to let to treat an assumptions as fact.

When you do that, your actions are based on untested data about the world, the market and your audience, and that means you might well end up moving in the exact opposite direction of where you want to go.

“I’ll just put ads on Facebook for my business, and then I can scale up”.

Maybe. But you’re basing that on success that others have had, you assume that you can replicate that success in your own way and for your own audience, and you assume that Facebook actually shows your ad to the right people.

That’s a lot of assumptions behind your strategy, and if you then also assume that ‘more ads’ will lead to ‘better results, in the end’, then poof: gone is your advertising budget.

Instead, treat everything like a scientist would:

“My hypothesis is that Action X will produce result Z”, and then you test whether or not the hypothesis holds ground.

Measure results, adjust the strategy (meaning: use a new hypothesis), and run the next experiment.

I’m not a scientist, but it seems that’s how scientists go about things.

After all, proof is a lot more useful than assumptions, and testing hypotheses is how you establish proof.

So if ever you try something and it’s not working, the first action is to ask yourself:

Which assumptions did I hold as true?

Where did that divert me from taking the actions that get me the results I want?

Cheers,

Martin

Simple

Building or running a business can be hard, but it should never be complicated, because that’s just no good for the mind.

Simple is good.

The fewer moving parts in anything, the easier it is to run the thing, test it, find flaws or bottlenecks, and fix and optimise.

Same thing goes for business. You can make your business as complicated as you like, with teams, advertisements, funnels, infrastructure, franchise – you name it. A world of options.

But the more you add in, the more complex it gets and the harder it gets to figure out what’s broken and needs fixing, or what works and merits more resources.

So here’s a model I came up with, which you can use to analyse your own business, and keep it as simple as possible:

Step 1: Values.

These inform your purpose and your mission. And, they enable you to identify and find people who share your values, so that you’ll have rapport with them.

Step 2: Assets

These can be tangible, like a list of names, hardware, office space – or intangible, such as your network, your skillset, your footprint and visibility, or the amount of goodwill and buy-in your audience has for you.

Step 3: Systems

This is where you tie the first two steps together, and build structures, frameworks, standard operating procedures – and points of measurement, so that you’ll know what works and what doesn’t.

Now as a framework this is useful, but how do you make it *work*?

Simple: ask yourself these questions (longhand brainstorming is best, for this kind of Q&A).

1: What are my values? What would I stand on a barricade for? What do I not accept, what change am I willing to fight or stake things for?

2: What assets do I have in place? What tangible value does each have in my business, what economic value if applicable, and what potential does each asset have, given smart leverage?

3: What systems are in place, and in what way can they be simplified or improved so that they work better, or become easier to measure for output and results?

4: What outcomes are my systems producing?

Because everything is a either a system or part of one, and every system is perfect for the outcome it produces. So if you see outcomes you’d like to change, you now know which system to improve.

How to improve it? By looking at how your values and assets can be combined and leveraged so that the system, again, becomes simpler and more measurable.

Yes, this is an exercise that can take a few hours, but it’s super useful, because it gives you clarity, direction, and purpose.

Or, we can have a conversation, to have a look at your values, assets, and systems, and to see what’s the quickest way to get you to landing more clients and making more money.

It’s a 30 minute strategy session, there’s no cost, but it will be useful and fun.

(In case you’re wondering: Yes, I’ll likely ask if you want to work together afterwards – but trust that I won’t be trying to convince or coerce – that wouldn’t be fun, would it now :)

Here’s my calendar, just pick a time…

Cheers,

Martin

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