"…and Then the Whale Blew Up in My Face", Said the Man

Of course the whale blew up: he frigging put dynamite in the poor thing.

Same thing happens in oh-so-many businesses: “Let’s try this thing, that will definitely solve our problem!”

 

BANG…….

True story:

In 1970, a whale ended up beached in Oregon.

Whales smell bad. Really bad. Especially if you let them sit dead on a beach for a week.

Nobody had any idea how to get rid of it.

Each day the thing stank worse.

A local genius had an idea: “Let’s blow the thing up with dynamite!”

The reasoning: all the small bits will get eaten by seagulls and other scavengers. Problem solved.

So they put dynamite in the carcass and pushed down on the detonator.

A huge blast ensued. They had to make sure the thing was blown UP, and make sure they did.

Within seconds, chunks of meat, bone, and blubber flew hundreds of feet in the air, and landed over a huge radius.

Everyone on-site was absolutely covered in vile-smelling whale blubber.

Cars were crushed by falling chunks, and the guy who had come up with the brilliant idea spent the rest of his life being ridiculed.

Whenever they asked him about it, right until he passed away yesterday, he said:

“I don’t want to talk about the whale. Every time I do, it blows up in my face”.

I’ll bet it did.

 

Why this matters to you?

Careful what you do out there.

What seems like a good idea today might indeed blow up in your face.

Decisions have consequences, and they can last until you die.

Or, for as long as you’re in business.

The design you’re about to choose, the product you want to launch…

The intern you want to take on…

The employee you want to fire…

The SEO or marketing strategy you’re about to deploy…

That really funny tweet you are about to send in reaction to a news event…

Are you sure you’re not about to dynamite a whale?

How, really, CAN you be sure?

Here’s how: you hire an external adviser to review your plan, and to give you a reality check.

That still isn’t a guarantee things will work out, but it’s one terrific way to avoid being covered in stinking whale-blubber.

 

Or, in business terms: External advice will…

… prevent wasting money on inefficient strategies

… verify and justify the expense in time or cash required – or tell you how to get more bang for your buck

… refine your plan, scrap the superfluous and leverage the underutilised

… give you the certainty that your plan makes business sense

… or if your plan is risky, external advice will provide you with a different plan that does make sense and is less of a liability

 

One thing: when you seek advice, it’s best to pay for it. If you want advice that will really work for you, that is.

That’s just how the mind works.

Free advice reaches our mind as ‘low value’ information.

We listen to the interesting bits, we use the things that make sense.

The rest, we discard, making the body of advice mostly useless to us.

Advice only becomes valuable to us when it costs us something of value

Psychological fact.

The more someone pays for a book, coaching, training, advice, a course or whatever, the higher their likelihood of getting massive benefit out of it.

If it costs you something to get advice, you BET you’re going to be all ears and implement everything you’re being told.

Anyway, that’s just a little tip.

 

The point is: Be careful, be thorough, and think things through.

Oh and yes: if you want advice, I’ve got some real good stuff here: http://martinstellar.com/consulting/

Best to hook up with me before you push down on that detonator.

 

Cheers,

Martin

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