[CRD Pillar 6] A Nightclub, a Cathedral and a Trainstation Walk Into a Bar…

What do those three have in common?

If you say ‘nought’, you’re missing an important point.

Consider:

You walk into a cathedral, and instantly you’re beset by a feeling of almost palpable calm.

Walk into a trainstation, and you can’t avoid feeling the bustle and the hectic stress.

Walk into a nightclub, and you instantly feel ‘partaaaay!’.

Now you get what they have in common?

Contextual influence. Each of those places, and in fact every place you’ll ever be in, will influence you by nature of its aspects.

Every context and every ecology you’ll ever find, bears upon you.

Problem is, nearly all of our contexts and environments are way too subtle to notice – but they influence you just the same. Just not in the same dramatic way.

But throughout your life and your days, you are never not in a physical context, and the cumulative effect of your ecology can’t not have an influence.

This is why pillar 5 of the CRD system is context&ecology, because if you don’t protect and deliberately optimise your context, your calm, focus and wellbeing are constantly broken down.

That’s why in my house and my office, everything has a place and everything is (most all the time) in its place.

It’s why I pick music specifically for my different activities: funk for getting revved up or making art, mathematical music like jazz and Zappa solos and Bach for writing long stretches, soft music for winding down.

And, it’s why you couldn’t get me into a shopping mall if there was a pot of gold. (Ok, I’d go in but I’d be out right quick).

You might think that your context doesn’t affect you much, but that would only be because you’ve grown numb to the low quality of them.

I promise that if you start to look at, and optimise for well-being, everything you can about your context and ecology, you’ll start a phase
in life where you won’t ever want to let negative influences creep back in.

So, here’s a question:

What is the lowest hanging fruit – the most easy to optimise – aspects of the context you move through most frequently?

Cheers,

Martin


Also published on Medium.

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